Adam Werbach on the Strategic Advantage of Sustainability

Jan 24, 2019

More than ever before, consumers, employees, and investors share a common purpose and a passion for companies that do well by doing good. So any strategy without sustainability at its core is just plain irresponsible—bad for business, bad for shareholders, bad for the environment.

In his book Strategy for Sustainability, author Adam Werbach argues that sustainability is now a true competitive strategic advantage and building it into the core of your business is the only means to ensure that your company—and your world—will survive.

Jon Bidwell on Driving Innovation from Within

Jan 24, 2019

When Jon Bidwell became the Chubb Group of Insurance Cos.’s first ever chief innovation officer, his mission was to increase the speed, pace, and profitability of Chubb’s products and services, involving a global network of 10,000 employees. Bidwell realized that the best way to generate innovation as quickly as possible was to tap into the company’s 10,000 employees, those who knew from first-hand experience what could make the organization work better. The conservative culture at Chubb gave way to a radical program that tapped into the company’s internal resources, generating thousands of ideas for organizational improvement.

Robbie Vorhaus on Branding Your Business Through Stories

Jan 24, 2019

What is your story? Who is your audience? How are you telling your story? Robbie Vorhaus, of Vorhaus Communications, says that with good storytelling companies can brand and market themselves to really get attention. Every company has a soul and a story to tell.

Michael Song on How to Get More Done with Fewer Meetings

Jan 24, 2019

Meetings have changed. They’re more frequent, virtual, and informal. Yet, most professionals haven’t upgraded their meeting skills. It’s no wonder that 43% of meeting time is wasted. In The Hamster Revolution for Meetings: Your Guide to Effective Meetings in the Information Age, best-selling author Michael Song discusses how to keep your meetings productive, on track, and engaging.

Aaron Sandoski on How the Wise Decide

Jan 24, 2019

How do the wise decide and lead businesses and organizations to great success is the question Bryn Zeckhauser and Aaron Sandoski posed to themselves after landing their first jobs as managers. Despite the best training the world could offer—Harvard MBAs and stints at McKinsey & Company, the elite powerhouse consulting firm—they felt unprepared when faced with the pressure to make critical decisions. So they set out on a three-year quest to discover how people with remarkable success and experience in both corporate and public life—“the wise”—went about making crucial, often make-or-break decisions. They share their discoveries in their book How the Wise Decide: The Lessons of 21 Extraordinary Leaders.

 

Lynn Taylor on How to Tame an Office Tyrant

Jan 24, 2019

Most people simply endure the tirades, mood swings, and incessant questions from their tyrannical bosses. But a new book by Lynn Taylor, Tame Your Terrible Office Tyrant, addresses the situation and shows the readers how to build positive relationships with even the most out-of-control boss and still thrive in their job.

Beth Fisher-Yoshida and Kathy Geller on Transnational Leadership

Jan 24, 2019

Transnational Leadership Development by Beth Fisher-Yoshida and Kathy Geller acquaints readers with the paradoxes and mental processes leaders need to relate successfully to people with different backgrounds, cultures, and societal identities. The book advises readers on how leaders may learn to see, feel, and experience the world with different lenses; take the necessary amount of time to reflect on what they know and what they need to know; find new ways to communicate; and be resilient in the face of this unique challenge.

Dr. Graham Jones on Mental Toughness

Jan 24, 2019

What does Lebron James have in common with Warren Buffet? Whether we’re getting ready for the big game or the big meeting, we all deal with high pressure situations; it’s natural to everyone on the job and a reality of the workforce. In his new book Thriving on Pressure: Mental Toughness for Real Leaders, Dr. Graham Jones encourages us to channel that pressure and make the hard decisions.

Thomas Harrison on How to Develop Your Leadership Instincts

Jan 24, 2019

Is the ability to succeed in business hardwired into our DNA? Are entrepreneurs, like racing thoroughbreds, simply born to win? Instinct, by Thomas L. Harrison, is the first book to apply the tools and insights of human genome research to the concept of success. Harrison, a corporate CEO who began his career as a cell biologist, argues that successful people, particularly successful entrepreneurs, tend to have certain identifiable talents encoded in their genes. Harrison shows readers how to determine if they have inherited these genes, and how to compensate if they are lacking in some of these vital traits.

Thomas Harrison is chairman and chief executive officer of Diversified Agency Services (DAS), the world’s largest holding group of marketing services companies.


 

Marc Cugnon and Alaina Love on Finding Your Passion at Work

Jan 24, 2019

Smart managers know how to engage their employees. The best way to do that is to engage their passions and access what they care about so employees will care about their work and learn to enjoy it. Marc Cugnon and Alaina Love have devised a system to determine what drives employees’ passions

Nilofer Merchant on Real Collaboration

Jan 24, 2019

Management gurus have always said “people matter.” But those same gurus still relegate strategy to an elite set of executives who focus on frameworks, long presentations, and hierarchical approaches. After many years of working with Apple, Adobe, HP, among others, Nilofer Merchant discovered the best way to create a winning strategy, which she details in her book, The New How: Creating Business Solutions Through Collaborative Strategy.

Chip Bell on Creating “Take Their Breath Away” Customer Service

Jan 24, 2019

Customers are bored! Service providers, chastised by the “less-than-exciting” results of their surveys, have put all their eggs in the “improvement” basket.” According to Chip Bell, “Take Their Breath Away” service is about bringing a new spirit to the service world. His new book Take Their Breath Away, coauthored by John R. Patterson, offers a practical blueprint and courage-builder for business pioneers who are unwilling to be lulled into complacency by the same old service practices.

Alice Adams on Bridging the Gender Divide at Work

Jan 24, 2019

Men are from Mars. Women are from Venus. This popular summation of the gender divide is given a lot of credence in the workplace. But the fact is that working women and men are far more alike than commonly realized—and managers who understand that can develop lasting, productive gender equity at work. In Playing to Strength, Alice Adams guides managers and organizations who want to achieve the type of gender-balanced environment that brings out the best in both men and women.

Josh Leibner and Gershon Mader on the Power of Strategic Commitment

Jan 24, 2019

Most managers and executives don’t have a clear system for ensuring the support they need from those around them. In The Power of Strategic Commitment (AMACOM), authors Josh Leibner and Gershon Mader advise on how improve strategic processes by enlisting the support of managers, employees, boards, suppliers, investors, and others. The book outlines the key factors that determine commitment, providing powerful ways to build buy-in that cost nothing.

Steve Kerr on Performance Rewards Systems That Really Work

Jan 24, 2019

It’s one of the thorniest management problems around: dealing with unmotivated, low-performing employees. It’s easy to point the finger of blame at them. But in most companies, it’s the reward system, not the workforce, that’s causing poor attitudes and performance: many reward systems actually discourage desired behaviors while rewarding the very actions that drive executives crazy.

In Reward Systems: Does Yours Deliver? Steve Kerr describes the steps you must take to create an effective reward system:

- Clarify what you mean by “performance” — in ways that help employees understand how they can support what you’re trying to accomplish
- Devise an effective performance-measurement system that distinguishes between metrics used for control and those used for employees’ development
- Design a reward system that motivates people to do what you want them to do while also meeting their needs

Claire Wyckoff and Nat Stoddard on Selecting the Right Leader

Jan 24, 2019

Leadership failures damage or even destroy companies every day. The Right Leader: Selecting Executives Who Fit by Nat Stoddard and Claire Wyckoff  describes a revolutionary process for selecting executives based on years of consulting for some of America’s largest companies. The book offers a new approach to eliminate the leadership failures that plague so many companies around the world today. The Right Leader introduces the “Match-Fit Model” and explains how it reduces the risks and costs of executive failure by changing the factors that are considered and by taking into account the cultural dynamics at play in any organization.

Tim Sanders on How Companies Profit from Doing Good

Jan 24, 2019

In a follow-up to his popular  2008 Edgewise interview, Tim Sanderstalks about how the “make a difference” factor is revolutionizing brand building, and how companies not paying attention to this change in marketing and mission branding are at the verge of obsolescence. Sanders offers practical advice every individual and company can use to make the world a better place–now and in the future.

In Saving the World at Work, Tim Sanders offers concrete suggestions on how all of us can help our companies join the Responsibility Revolution. Drawing on extensive interviews with hundreds of employees and CEOs, and illuminated by countless stories of people who are making a difference in the workplace and in the world,

Paul Krugman on Staring Down Depression Economics

Jan 24, 2019

Edgewise is pleased to bring an extended conversation with Dr. Paul Krugman, Professor of Economics and International Affairs at Princeton University, a regular columnist for the New York Times, and the 2008 recipient of the Nobel Prize in Economics. In this interview Dr. Krugman provides a concise account of the events that led to the current economic crisis, and offers a prognosis for recovery. Dr. Krugman shares insights from his book The Great Unraveling: Losing Our Way in the New Economy. In this book, Dr. Krugman chronicles how the boom economy unraveled: how exuberance gave way to pessimism, how the age of corporate heroes gave way to corporate scandals, how fiscal responsibility collapsed; and offers a road map for recovery.

Bill Capodagli on Innovating the Pixar Way

Jan 24, 2019

With films like Toy Story and Wall-E, Pixar is the most prominent animation studio in the world. There is still a business to run and Bill Capodagli says that Pixar approaches that with the same innovation that they use on their films.

Dawn Fotopulos and How to Get Comfortable with Accounting

Jan 24, 2019

In her new book Accounting for the Numberphobic: A Survival Guide for Small Business Owners, Dawn Fotopulos attempts to reduce the number of small business failures by examining the struggles of owners attempting to turn their hobbies into jobs. Fotopulos argues that the key to success will not come from a constant attempt to attract new customers, but rather adopting a strategy in which owners successfully manage what they already have. Dawn believes that in order to be successful, owners must be able to first observe what has been going on in their business, while at the same time look ahead to predict possible outcomes in the near future.

Alan Trefler on Keeping an Eye on Consumers

Jan 24, 2019

In his book, Build for Change: Revolutionary Customer Engagement through Continuous Digital Innovation, Alan Trefler discusses the divergence that is becoming more and more visible between successful leading companies and the not so successful companies. Trefler argues that consumers are becoming more empowered and are gaining the upper hand against big businesses that provide essential services for them. Trefler says that it is now up to companies to start determining the intent of the customer, and what keeps them coming back for more. To do this, companies must leave behind traditional management approaches and adopt a new system which looks at customers holistically.

Josh Linkner on Thinking about What Can Be

Jan 24, 2019

In The Road to Reinvention: How to Drive Disruption and Accelerate Transformation, author Josh Linkner discusses re-inventing, creating something anew, and imagining what “can-be” instead of “what-is.” Linkner suggests several strategies for re-invention, but one of the most important is the habit of pushing the envelope and having an ongoing re-invention approach, where companies are constantly changing all aspects of their business. To be successful, Linkner states that everyone must be able to re-invent, innovate, and adapt, and this is for employees working on all levels of the business.

Sanjay Khosla and Mohanbir Sawhney on Fewer, Bigger, Bolder

Jan 24, 2019

In Fewer, Bigger, Bolder: From Mindless Expansion to Focused Growth, Sanjay Khosla and Mohanbir Sawhney discuss how companies fall into the trap of stretching themselves thin in attempts to provide more services and products across more markets. They call this practice the “seduction of more.” They believe that specializing in fewer areas can actually be more beneficial to companies, since it allows for services to be provided in a bigger and bolder manner. In the book, Khosla and Sawhney have developed a comprehensive framework to benefit companies in the attempt to become more focused.

Michael Watkins on Navigating Your Career Transition

Jan 24, 2019

Transitions into new roles are the crucibles in which leaders get their toughest tests, and they’re the defining factor in professional careers today. Yet far too often, leaders fail to transition effectively into new roles. The resulting costs are high, for your career and the organization.

In Your Next Move, leadership-transition guru Michael Watkins shows how leaders can survive and thrive in all the major transitions you will face during your career, including promotion, on-boarding into a new organization, and making an international move. With real-life examples and case studies, he illustrates the defining hurdles associated with each type of transition.

John Baldoni on How to Lead Your Boss

Jan 24, 2019

In Lead Your Boss, recognized leadership guru John Baldoni gives managers new as well as tried and true methods for influencing both their bosses and their peers, and giving senior leaders reasons to follow their lead.

David Ulrich on How HR Transforms the Future

Jan 24, 2019

David Ulrich is co-founder of the RBL Group and professor of business at the University of Michigan’s Raw School of Business. He’s ranked number one as a management educator guru by Business Week.  He was selected by Fast Company as one of the ten most innovate and creative leaders. He has been named HR Magazine’s most influential person in the HR field four out of the last five years and was most recently listed number 31 on the Thinker’s 50 global ranking of business gurus. He’s written 20 books covering topics in HR and leadership, including The Leadership Code and HR Transformation.

Rosabeth Moss Kanter on the 21st Century Super Corporation

Jan 24, 2019

For over 30 years, Rosabeth Moss Kanter has been a leading thinker in strategy, innovation and change management. Among her best-selling influential books are The Change Masters, Men and Women of the Corporation, and Confidence. Her new book is titled SuperCorp: How Vanguard Companies Create Innovation, Profits, Growth, and Social Good. In SuperCorp, Kanter looks at the emerging best practices of twenty-first century business, and the management skills required to get there.

Sylvia Lafair on Breaking Family Patterns That Limit Success

Jan 24, 2019

You know the type. Maybe he’s the office cut up or the woman who manages to look busy but avoids work or the guy who was the long suffering victim. There’s one in every office. Perhaps you or someone you know fits one of these profiles. These behaviors are painfully annoying and start conflict in the offic

Mark Johnson on Finding Consumer Needs

Jan 24, 2019

In his new book, Mark Johnson developed the idea of White Space, a need in the market that your company can meet. Whether it’s improving on what you already work on or finding something new to perfect, every company has some White Space just waiting to be filled.

Leighton Read on What Avatar Teaches Us About Work

Jan 24, 2019

Leadership. Quality analysis. Problem solving. Sales. They’re tasks not only found in business, but also in online role playing games. By using entertainment as a model, Leighton Reed says we can change the way we approach our work.

Dr. Susan Smith Kuczmarski and Thomas Kuczmarski on Changing the Way We Lead and Succeed

Jan 24, 2019

For centuries, leaders have been operating within a "control and compete mindset. But times are changing. More and more, at the helm of successful companies, you'll find a different sort of leader. Collaborators, not controllers, they are "square apples", bold men and women who dare to create success by reshaping the workplace in unexpected ways. In their book Apples are Square: Thinking Differently about Leadership, Susan Smith Kuczmarski and Tom Kuczmarski profile 25 values-based leaders to discover a new model of leadership for the 21st century. "Squared apples" symbolically stand for a new way to lead in the workplace and a new way to measure success--both personally and professionally.... We, as a society, need to take bruised work environments and reshape them into dynamic, inclusive, and collaborative organizations. Likewise, we need to reexamine the central core within our own personal life. Is the core selfish or selfless? ... Is our orientation geared toward using people or getting the most out of them for themselves as well as for the good of the organization? Serving others, helping others, and inspiring others to bring out their inner core of strengths and talents is what the new definition of success is all about.  In this weeks You've Been Spotted segment, Kevin Lee asks participants from AMA's course "Management Skills for New Supervisors" about what challenges they face as team leaders. Listen to these participants share what they've learned from the course.

Dr. Yasmin Davidds on Women's Negotiation Skills

Jan 24, 2019

Negotiation is always difficult but for women it can be a minefield of politics and unconscious biases. That's why Dr. Yasmin Davidds, co-author of Your Own Terms, published by AMACOM, teaches gender-specific negotiation tactics. She leverages traditionally feminine strengths, such as collaboration, to work in women's favor and get them the raise or promotion they're after.

Ralph Sink on How to Bring Back High-Performance Management

Jan 24, 2019

“The high-performance systems approach — also known as self-organizing teams and participative management — endows people throughout an enterprise with the skills, understanding, processes, and authority they need to make their own decisions on behalf of quality and business success, instead of having all the ideas and commands flow from the top,” writes Ralph Sink in his thought-provoking article “My Unfashionable Legacy,” published in Strategy+Business. “Despite the successes of high-performance systems, the concept is less fashionable in management circles than it used to be… The next generation of managers, particularly on the operations and shop-floor side, don’t always have the skills and training to design, create, and lead high-performance systems, and there’s a real danger that this knowledge could be lost entirely. Now is the time for my colleagues and me to cast our minds back and distinguish, once and for all, the factors that made us succeed.”

Steve McKee on What to Do When Growth Stalls

Jan 24, 2019

Stalled growth is the rule, not the exception—even for the best-managed companies. That’s especially true in unpredictable economic environments such as the one we’re experiencing today. Steve McKee commissioned a study of 700 companies that had at one time been among the nation’s fastest-growing businesses. In his book, When Growth Stalls, McKee presents compelling knowledge about how and why companies lose their way and offers practical advice about how they can rekindle growth.

Michael Dulworth on The Connect Effect

Jan 24, 2019

Beyond merely widening the circle of people you know, strong networks foster deeper learning and broaden your exposure across a range of issues. Effective investments in your networks can make you smarter, more knowledgeable, and better grounded, as well as a more agile learner and collaborator.

In The Connect Effect, author Michael Dulworth identifies three distinct kinds of networks: personal, professional, and virtual, exploring their specific characteristics and offering strategies, tools, and resources for building up and making the best use of each one. Stories from Dulworth’s over twenty years of experience running networks, as well as interviews with top executives, researchers, and thought leaders, provide insights and advice about how networ

Beyond merely widening the circle of people you know, strong networks foster deeper learning and broaden your exposure across a range of issues. Effective investments in your networks can make you smarter, more knowledgeable, and better grounded, as well as a more agile learner and collaborator.

In The Connect Effect, author Michael Dulworth identifies three distinct kinds of networks: personal, professional, and virtual, exploring their specific characteristics and offering strategies, tools, and resources for building up and making the best use of each one. Stories from Dulworth’s over twenty years of experience running networks, as well as interviews with top executives, researchers, and thought leaders, provide insights and advice about how networks function in the real world.

Paddy Miller on Mission Critical Innovation

Jan 24, 2019

Paddy Miller is professor of Managing People in Organizations at IESE Business School. Dr. Miller is the author of a recent book, Mission Critical Leadership. Dr. Miller’s specializes in leadership, change management, and innovation, with a focus on multinational organizations. Dr. Miller has become extensively involved in the challenges faced by organizations during the transition to globalization.

Kurt Andersen on Resetting Our Economy the Right Way

Jan 24, 2019

“It’s the end of the world as we’ve known it,” Kurt Andersen writes in his book Reset, “but it isn’t the end of the world.” In his book, Andersen explains why the current economic crisis is actually an historic moment of great opportunity to get ourselves and the nation back on track.

Blythe McGarvie on Making Courageous Decisions in a Changing World

Jan 24, 2019

If the 20th century was the American century, the 21st century may well be the global century. Globalization spreads wealth across the world, opens new consumer markets, and reorients the dynamics of the American market. In a new book, Shaking The Globe: Courageous Decision Making In A Changing World, Blythe McGarvie guides readers on how to absorb the world’s diversity and to build upon his or her global citizenship by using the “FISO Factor:” skills to transform themselves from a conventional leader into a courageous one.

Jeffrey Hollender on Key Business Lessons in Going Green

Jan 24, 2019

Back when “green” was just a color and not a movement, Seventh Generation was already at work creating earth-friendly, non-toxic, energy-conserving products. Jeffrey Hollender, co-founder and chairman of Seventh Generation, believes that the companies that will succeed are the ones who embrace responsibility and a genuine interest in a better future. His new book, The Responsibility Revolution: How the Next Generation of Businesses Will Win, explains that companies need to take a holistic and systemic approach to everything to company does in order to win.

Ann Evanston on Successful Twitter-preneurship

Jan 24, 2019

More and more people believe that social networking on sites like LinkedIn, Facebook and now Twitter, make business sense. but how do you do it right without wasting tons of time and energy?

Follow AMA on Twitter! Serch for AMATalk.

Jill Griffin on Earning Loyalty in a Search and Switch World

Jan 24, 2019

The ability to compare price and product created by Internet search engines coupled with our insatiable desire for instant information have created a volatile new breed of buyer, the search and switch customer. In these bruising economic times, businesses unprepared to address this buyer are losing market share by the minute.

In her book Taming The Search and Switch Customer: Earning Customer Loyalty In A Compulsion To Compare World, loyalty guru    Jill Griffin, advisor to Microsoft, Dell, Toyota, Marriott, HP, Days Inn and Western Union, provides a fresh, new arsenal of loyalty solutions uniquely calibrated for today’s compulsion to compare planet of buyers.

Charles Jacobs on Why Feedback Doesn’t Work

Jan 24, 2019

Business people are taught to make decisions with facts and logic, and to avoid emotional bias. But according to the latest research, we almost never decide rationally, despite thinking that we do. Our experiences carry an emotional charge encoded in the synapses of our neurons. And when we try to deny what our emotions tell us, we lose what we’ve learned from the past. That’s just one of many recent discoveries that help explain why management is so challenging.

As author Charles Jacobs explains in new book, Management Rewired: Why Feedback Doesn’t Work and Other Surprising Lessons From The Latest Brain Science, much of the conventional wisdom taught to managers is not only inadequate; it produces the opposite of what was intended. The better path is frequently counterintuitive.

Cris Conde on Taking Steps to Prosper Through the Downturn

Jan 24, 2019

When Cris Conde saw the first signs of the recession, he didn’t waste any time. By paying attention to the warning signs and taking decisive action early, he put his company, Sunguard, in a position to compete while others were just trying to survive. By focusing on upcoming economic indicators (instead of looking back) and through the use of innovative inter-office technologies, he was able to avoid deep cuts to his workforce and Sunguard is now back to full capacity.

Forrest Breyfogle on Taking Six Sigma to the Next Level

Jan 24, 2019

Problem-solving or assessment methodologies such as Six Sigma, Lean Six Sigma, or ISO may not provide a business framework so that organizations can move toward achieving the three Rs of business: everybody doing the Right Things the Right Way at the Right Time.

In The Integrated Enterprise Excellence System: An Enhanced, Unified Approach to Balanced Scorecards, Strategic Planning, and Business Improvement , Forrest Breyfogle introduces a new organizational governance system that integrates analytics with innovation. The IEE system shows business leaders what to measure and report; when and how to report it; how to interpret and use the results to establish goals; how to orchestrate work activities; and how to develop strategies that is consistent with established goals. These strategies ultimately lead to specific projects that enhance organizational focus and success.

Selena Rezvani on the New Generations of Women Workers

Jan 24, 2019

Women may make up half of today’s workforce but only 3% of the Fortune 500 CEOs are women. Leadership roles have been hard-won by previous generations of women. Selena Rezvani gives women in Generations X and Y ideas on how to learn from these pioneering women. Her new book The Next Generation of Women Leaders encourages women to confidently move ahead into more leadership positions.

Vineet Nayar on Achieving Success by Putting Employees First, Customers Second

Jan 24, 2019

Nelson Mandella, Mahatma Ghandi, Martin Luther King Jr. They all had something in common: the ability to inspire people and make them want to change. Vineet Nayar looks to them as an example of how to effectively manage a company, by inspiring and listening to the employees and making them the priority. That way managing people becomes less about directing them in what to do and more about motivating them to make their own decisions.

Josh Bernoff on Keeping Ahead of the Technology Trends

Jan 24, 2019

Customers have turned out to be supersavvy when it comes to technology. It’s common practice to check the product reviews of everything from restaurants to the new vacuum cleaner before anyone even considers buying something. Josh Bernoff wants companies to embrace this tech-friendly mentality, to think outside the box, and to ignore the job title. It may be the employee you least expect who comes up with the idea that keeps the good reviews coming in.

Lisa Gansky on Collaborating to Get Ahead of the Competition

Jan 24, 2019

Toyota has rolled out a new ad campaign for the football season. In it, a mother worries about her son being hurt while he plays football for his high school. She tells us that since Toyota did testing on their cars to protect against head injuries, they decided to share their findings with football equipment manufacturers so helmets will be safer as well. So now the mother is more confident, both in her car and her son’s health. This ad is a perfect example of what Lisa Gansky calls The Mesh, the title of her new book, recommended by both Seth Godin and Dan Pink. Companies, like Toyota, who share information, rather than hoard it away, can still use this to their advantage in their marketing or simply in the new alliances they make with sister organizations.

Mike Mitchell on Encouraging Innovation for Everyone in Your Organization

Jan 24, 2019

Mike Mitchell wants to remind employees that innovation isn’t just about the big ideas. Innovation, by its definition, is simply a new idea, no matter how seemingly small. Even a tiny tweak in an existing process can make a difference either for customers or for the employees. This kind of thinking and these kinds of changes are possible for every employee, not just the ones with innovation in their job description.

Jonathan Byrnes on Focusing on the Profits, Not the Losses

Jan 24, 2019

When only 30% of your organization is responsible for 100% of the profits, it’s tempting to focus on getting the remaining 70% to catch up. Johnathan Byrnes disagrees. The most important thing is to make sure that those “islands” of profitability are protected and keep bringing in profits before turning all your attention on the losses. Thus, manpower is not spread thin, desperately trying to bail out the “red ink,” and high-performing teams will continue to subsidize the organization.

J.P. Flaum and Becky Winkler on Hiring for Emotional Intelligence

Jan 24, 2019

J.P. Flaum and Becky Winkler just finished a study that shows the most important skills in the workforce are interpersonal skills. For someone to get ahead, intelligence didn’t matter as much; a less prestigious candidate can always be trained. Traits like a willingness to learn, friendliness, and a collaborative attitude indicate future success much more strongly.

David Clemons and Michael Kroth on Managing Your Mobile Workforce

Jan 24, 2019

It’s a challenge to lead any employees but when a large number of them are mobile and don’t even show up in the office, the stakes are raised even further. Today’s technology makes it easier but David Clemons and Michael Kroth want to remind you that cell phones and e-mail are tools, not a solution. The smartest leaders don’t just hand their employees a Blackberry and send them on their way; they figure out how to use those tools to engage their mobile workers and keep them motivated, everything a face-to-face leader would do, just at a distance.

Rick Lepsinger on Aligning Leadership Style with the Company’s Mission

Jan 24, 2019

James Sinegal, cofounder of Costco, isn’t your average CEO. His office overlooks a parking lot. He sits at a metal desk with a metal chair. His salary is less than half a million dollars (bonus included!), dramatically less than other CEOs, especially given the value he brings to his company. But in a company that’s all about thin margins, it’s the perfect attitude for a leader. Compare him to the auto company executives who flew to Washington in private jets to ask for bailout money. When the leader’s attitude matches the company mission and goals, that’s what Rick Lepsinger calls “alignment” in his new book Closing the Execution Gap. He points out that an organization’s leaders have to do more than just write the mission statement, they have to live the values they put forth and lead by example.

Howard Guttman on Shifting Focus to Achieve Results

Jan 24, 2019

Howard Guttman has several tools for how to achieve any goal, from getting the promotion to quitting smoking, as just two examples. One way is to change the stories we tell ourselves; change the narrative we think we’re in to change the outcome. If we think we’re in a no-win situation, the results will match. He recommends that we know what the intended outcome is, focus on that, and always remember to ask for help.

Russell Bishop on Workarounds that Work

Jan 24, 2019

Dealing with emergencies and roadblocks is never easy, especially in the recent economy where budgets and staff are stretched thin. An even bigger problem is when the problem solving is stalled by bureaucracy and waiting for permission. Russell Bishop has several stories of employees who, instead of waiting, took the initiative, took the problem into their own hands, and came up with effective workarounds to get the job done.

Daryl Wizelman on Retaining Talent Through the Recession

Jan 24, 2019

During the recession, many a worker has been told that they should put up with their lot and they’re lucky to have a job at all; the recession is an excuse to employers to treat their staff however they want. The result, however, is that once the economy turns around, talented employees will leave as soon as they can. Daryl Wizelman says that to avoid this, employers have to show respect to their employees, during the good times and the bad. It’s as simple as giving warning if there are going to be layoffs to give those in danger time to look for another job and telling talented workers that they’ll be the first hired back when the economy turns around. This kinder approach is beneficial for both sides, giving employees a more comfortable environment to work in and keeps them loyal to their employers.

Adrian Gostick on Creating Engaging Teams

Jan 24, 2019

When Medical City Dallas Hospital wanted to increase its patient satisfaction scores, it didn’t just rewrite another long mission statement or come up with a new set of rules. It said It wanted “to create raving fans out of our patients and families.” The phrase “raving fans” got the employees’ minds engaged, and they started to think about their jobs in a whole new light: every time they had patient interaction they had to think, will this make a “raving fan"?  Their satisfaction scores went up as a result. That is just one of the stories about teamwork and engagement that Adrian Gostick has to share about tiny tweaks that shift the mindset of employees to create big changes.

Wayne Rogers in our 200th Episode

Jan 24, 2019

We have a very special guest for our 200th episode of Edgewise: Wayne Rogers, former MASH star and AMACOM author. He joined us to talk about how he made the transition from actor to businessman and how the two professions aren’t that dissimilar.

Linda Hill on Making the Transition to Management

Jan 24, 2019

Just because someone gets promoted, it doesn’t mean he or she's “made it.” The person still has to maintain a standard of excellence in a new job with new stakes. It’s not as easy to move up in a company as people think. There is a learning curve, even learning to delegate former responsibilities. Linda Hill gives us a few strategies for how to handle the new promotion or just be more understanding of the newly promoted manager.

Mike Noble on Communicating Changes Effectively

Jan 24, 2019

When it comes to change, communication is crucial. According to Mike Noble, employees not only must be made aware of the coming changes but also why they are being made and what the budget and time frame are. Otherwise employees will be resistant, no change will ever take place, and the organization will fall behind competitors.

Robbie Vorhaus on Making Changes to Be More Efficient

Jan 24, 2019

Robbie Vorhaus wants you to be a watchmaker, not a timekeeper. A timekeeper may always know what time it is, but if they look away from the clock for one moment, they’re not useful anymore. A watchmaker, however, can create a product that will do the job for him or her, and then go on vacation without losing money. The goal is to build skills and a team that make you necessary and still let you step away.

Mark Murphy on How to Get to Where You Want to Be

Jan 24, 2019

To Mark Murphy, the key to success is visualization, for personal goals as well as business goals. If you’re training for a marathon, it’s helpful to imagine crossing the finish line. The same is true for business. If the company has goals, it’s up to the managers to paint a picture of success that inspires the employees, gets them motivated, and helps them meet that goal.

Ray Anderson on a Commitment to Environmental Sustainability

Jan 24, 2019

Being environmentally conscious isn’t just a fad for Ray Anderson. He was working to raise awareness long before the trend of “going green.” To him, it’s more than just a marketing phrase, it’s a way of doing business. It’s also a way to reduce waste and, in the long run, save money, but only if the company is genuinely committed.

John Beeson on the Unwritten Rules of Getting Ahead

Jan 24, 2019

You work hard and get consistently solid performance reviews but still haven’t landed the coveted management level promotion you know you deserve. In his new book, Unwritten Rules, John Beeson explains that you need to be much more than a workhorse to transcend the cubicle walls and just how take the reins of your career trajectory.

With 20 years of management experience and a birds-eye perspective of promotion and executive placement decision making, Beeson has identified the six essential skills you must embody to bolster your career to the next level. He explicitly outlines the attributes and strategies necessary to successfully clear the invisible hurdles that could be holding you back from your C-Level Suite.

Seth Godin on the Death of Books and Rebirth of Ideas

Jan 24, 2019

One might presume that Seth Godin, having penned more than a dozen best-sellers and hailed as America’s greatest marketer, has found a magic formula and is sticking with it. However, in his new e-book Poking the Box, Godin shatters logic by encouraging readers to give the book away, exposing an ambition to develop minds, not dollars. In this episode of Edgewise, he expounds on why the exchange of content via new media is more than a means to make a living, and how to leverage it to ultimately make an impact.

Michael Nick on Selling to the C-Suite

Jan 24, 2019

In today's fickle economy, senior executives are no longer relying solely on ROI in their purchase planning. In his book Key to the C-suite, Michael Nick outlines the additional financial metrics being used to make buying decisions and empowers sales professionals with the tools to communicate within this new landscape. He explains how to skillfully articulate your value to their bottom line and how to build a business case by assessing your value inventory and leveraging new tools like Linkedin to gain a leg up of insight on the client.

Tony Miller on Systemically Strengthening Our Schools

Jan 24, 2019

In devising his strategy to bolster the nation’s eroded educational framework, Deputy Secretary of the U.S. Department of Education, Anthony Miller, pulls from his business background as well as international research on the processes and metrics employed by other countries to raise the academic bar. At the core of Miller's blueprint is the alignment of student achievement goals and initiatives with budgets and operating plans, as well as making critical investments in training teachers, particularly in the use of technology and collaboration tools to facilitate communication and maximize targeted learning. He also discusses partnerships between major corporations and higher education systems, and the importance of deploying such initiatives to equip students with the competencies most essential to competing and exceling in the 21st century global workplace.

Elizabeth Harrin on Emerging Social Media Technology

Jan 24, 2019

Social media has emerged over the last decade as the most prominent online presence; very few Websites are static pages with no updates or interaction anymore. These breakthroughs in technology are supposed to make communication easier but there can be so many different brands and platforms available, the choice of provider can be daunting. However, our guest Elizabeth Harrin points out that not every option to communicate requires thousands of dollars and long meetings with IT: blogs and wikis are free, easy, and widespread. A simple but effective technological approach can make all the difference to internal communication and to the customer base as well.

Stephen Wunker on Capturing New Markets

Jan 24, 2019

Exxon is to kerosene as Nintendo Wii is to Atari. In his book Capturing New Markets, Stephen Wunker expounds on the premise that with every successful new product, platform or medium, comes an underrepresented audience to be tapped into. Wunker explicitly explains how to leverage innovation for market domination.

Tony Beshara on Unbeatable Resumes

Jan 24, 2019

In today’s job market, applicants are often focused on submitting resume after resume and less on crafting a solid CV for each position.  In this episode of Edgewise, America’s top recruiter, Tony Beshara, tells how to prime your resume and put it in the hands of decision-makers. He has collected his findings from 30 years of perusing resumes and cover letters into his latest book, Unbeatable Resumes, (AMACOM) breaking down the approach to a cross section of career levels, job titles, and job functions. Beshara not only specifies the critical components of stand-out resume, he arms applicants with strategies to get themselves  out of the application abyss into an actual interview, and even how to master awkward questions.

Steven Pressfield on Doing the Work

Jan 24, 2019

How many brilliant projects have you begun in your mind? In this episode of Edgewise, author Steven Pressfield discusses his latest book, Do the Work, which is geared to be a mental boot camp that kick starts artists and entrepreneurs out of their heads and into action. He takes on public enemy #1, resistance, which comes in the form of fear of failure for some, or research paralysis for others. Pressfield's goal is to have you recognize your limiting thoughts and behaviors, fight them, and get the work DONE. While he targets creative people, the ideas are applicable to anyone relying on inner strength to execute a meaningful endeavor. Pressfield helps us think of resistance as the rest-stop on your creative path. You know it’s coming up.  So, are you going to stop and get the Cinnabon? Or hold out and accelerate down your road to success.

Carol Sanford on the Responsible Business

Jan 24, 2019

It’s tough for corporations to strike the right chord of corporate responsibility in today’s fickle economic climate. While more companies are starting  green initiatives to project a positive public image, they are also cutting back on employee development. Carol Sanford, CEO of InterOctave Development Group and author The Responsible Business: Reimagining Sustainability and Success, contends that this kind of dissension creates a less than harmonious corporate culture, which ultimately leads to failure. In this episode of Edgewise, Sanford explains that creating sustainability is not about outlining strategies and processes to yield return. It’s about identifying your business mantra and making sure every aspect of the business is conducted in this spirit.

Conant and Norgaard on the Leadership Touch

Jan 24, 2019

“Everyone has experienced the pleasure of working with someone who is learning and growing, and everyone has experienced the pain of working with someone who is not,” affirms Douglas Conant, CEO of Campbell’s Soup. Conant  is coauthor with strategic leadership expert, Mette Norgaard, Ph.D, In their book Touch Points: Creating Powerful Leadership Connections in the Smallest of Moments, Conant and Mette Norgaard, Ph.D, a strategic leadership expert, call for executives and managers to commit to employee development. Mette’s metrics-based research find that strategic, meaningful interactions are what galvanize people to make ideas happen and ultimately drive success. Listen as Conant and Mette explain how these hands on investments in their employees, translate into exponential returns for companies. 

Scott Eblin on Executive Success

Jan 24, 2019

Statistics show that almost half of new executives do not make two years in their roles. Why is this? In this episode of Edgewise, Scott Eblin, executive coach, and author of The Next Level:  What Insiders Know About Executive Success, answers this question. Elbin shares insight from his experience coaching senior execs that have transcended the unspoken roadblocks and outlines which behaviors to shed and which to adopt in order to make a lasting mark as a leader.

Kristi Hedges on Establishing Executive Presence

Jan 24, 2019

Strong leaders have a notable “presence,” which Kristi Hedges, author of The Power of Presence defines as the quality to connect and inspire others. According to Hedges, anyone can refine his or her presence and become a leader in their domain through commitment and authenticity. She explains how to perform a “presence audit” to assess how others perceive you and how to apply that feedback towards developing a unique professional reputation. Listen and discover how to take initiative, be a visionary, and lead.

 

Mark Stevens on Declaring War on Yourself

Jan 24, 2019

When profits fall, dysfunction rises and morale flounders.  According to Mark Stevens, author of Your Company Sucks: It’s Time to Declare War on Yourself, the first step of recovery is introspection. Stevens asserts that great leaders pinpoint and take responsibility for their personal shortcomings and those of the company. Listen as he lays out the primary issues at the core of business failures, how to rectify them, combat complacency, and revive an organization.

 

Brendon Burchard on Developing a Million Dollar Message

Jan 24, 2019

You may not realize that you can channel your life experience into valuable advice people will pay to receive. In this episode of Edgewise, Brendon Burchard, author of  The Millionaire Messenger: Make a Difference and a Fortune Sharing Your Advice, explains the ten steps necessary to break into the lucrative Experts Industry. Listen as Brendon coneys how to leverage inexpensive tools to increase awareness and develop compelling products around your personal expertise.

Marcus Buckingham on Harnessing Your Key Strengths

Jan 24, 2019

Marcus Buckingham, author of the new book, Stand Out: The Groundbreaking New Strengths Assessment from the Leader of the Strengths Revolution, believes managers need a cheat sheet to help them identify their key strengths. Using this innovative self-assessment, find out whether your most defining traits characterize you as a pioneer, a teacher, a connector, or any of the other 9 strength roles Marcus identifies. Not only will he point out the consequences of mishandling your strengths, he will help you realize what career is best for you.

John C. Maxwell on Identifying Your Level of Leadership

Jan 24, 2019

Good leaders aren't developed overnight, as soon as they get the promotion. Leadership is an ongoing process; even the greats like Jack Welch are constantly honing their skills and abilities. Today's guest, John C. Maxwell, has developed a system that delineates the steps on the road to influential leadership in his new book, The Five Levels of Leadership. Whether you're a Level One that seeks to improve or a Level Five who wants to expand your influence, identifying which level you currently are will show you the steps needed to get to the next opportunity in your career.

Tim Phillips on Talking Normally at Work

Jan 24, 2019

For our last podcast of 2011 we talked to Tim Philips, author of Talk Normal, about the best way to speak professionally. While an evolving and agile language is generally a good thing, it can lead to misunderstandings, highly detrimental in the workplace, especially in a global world where English is mostly spoken as a second language. Tim stresses that perfect grammar and sounding smart is less important than clarity and understanding.

Mark Royal and Tom Agnew on Maximizing Employee Engagement

Jan 24, 2019

Organizations are always looking to get the best out of employees but the traditional means of doing so may be all wrong.  Mark Royal and Tom Agnew, authors of the book, Enemy of Engagement, think that strong and forward-looking managers enable their employees to channel their extra or discretionary efforts productively. They talk about how to feed your team’s desire to feel accomplished, create better support levels, and combat the common causes that lead to lack of employee engagement.

George Anders on Finding Exceptional Talent

Jan 24, 2019

What changes should your organization consider in order to get the most out of the recruitment process? New York Times bestselling author, George Anders, discusses this in his new book titled, The Rare Find: Spotting Exceptional Talent Before Everyone Else.  He emphasizes the importance of new technologies and social networking and how they play a critical role in finding all stars for your organization. In addition, he explains why testing and assessments are key elements of the recruiting process to build a strong team and corporate culture. Listen and learn as Anders shares how highly successful organizations such as GE, Facebook, and the U.S. Army identifying, recruit, and cultivate top performers.

Betty Shotton on the Principles of Liftoff Leadership

Jan 24, 2019

In this episode of Edgewise, Betty Shotton shares her experience as a serial entrepreneur, having founded and led six companies. She recently authored Liftoff Leadership, in which she pinpoints the key qualities and attributes necessary to kick-start your leadership trajectory.  She suggests a “pre-flight checklist,” and a series of assessments and questions, which she says allows leaders to identify their guiding principles. Listen as Shotton shares a few of the ten principles noted in her book, including: altruism, balance, and possibility.

Scott Keller on Sustaining Organizational Health

Jan 24, 2019

Scott Keller coauthor of Beyond Performance, discusses the extensive research he conducted in the field of organizational effectiveness. With performance and health managed with equal emphasis being the main takeaway, Keller elaborates on what he means by organizational health and how that directly links to an organization’s performance. Listen as Scott explains how to assess and revive your campanies health.

Kevin Kelly on the Future of Jobs: Man or Machine?

Jan 24, 2019

Kevin Kelly shares his views on technology driven innovations and the impact that these rapidly advancing technologies are having on job growth and employment numbers.  Kelly acknowledges that computers will continue to automate many jobs, though he states that technology is also facilitating new jobs at an even faster rate.  He predicts that jobs will continue to evolve rapidly in five to ten years, and that the most lucrative positions have not even been invented yet. You will also learn what he means by the “hacker mentality” and how this negative connotation can be seen as a type of exploration of design solving.

Dick Martin on Adapting to a Diversified World

Jan 24, 2019

Dick Martin joins us on Edgewise to discuss his latest book Otherwise: The Wisdom You Need To Succeed in A Diverse World. The main theme of this book is that businesses must strive to better understand people unlike themselves, and why this ability is now more important than ever. Martin touches on the three steps he describes in his book for businesses, such as Fox News and MSNBC, to adapt to the flux in society. He also discloses who he deems the most innovative marketers in the world.

Dov Seidman on Behavioral Changes to Guarantee Success

Jan 24, 2019

Dov Seidman joins us on Edgewise to discuss his book How: Why How We Do Anything Means Everything. He states that "we live in a world where what we do matters, but it doesn't matter as much as how we do what we do"; we are in a new era of behavior where our actions can affect so much more in ways they never could in the past. This is especially important to acknowledge as behavior has become the greatest source of our competitive advantage. Seidman describes what he calls the “how principles” and why these values guide our behavior. He will explain his solution for making jobs more interesting, inspiring and satisfying, using such examples as Southwest Airlines.

Micah Solomon on Customer Service in the 21st Century

Jan 24, 2019

Micah Solomon joins us on Edgewise to discuss his new book High-Tech, High-Touch Customer Service. He addresses the positive and negative effects technology has had on customer service today as well as the recent changes in the balance of power between customers and businesses. Using companies like Twitter and Yelp, Solomon describes the importance of immediate customer conversation and how customers now, more than ever, can easily choose to take their business elsewhere. Other good examples of technology harness for revenue are companies like Netflix and Amazon that tap in to people’s strong desire for self-service and the need to receive things much faster than ever.

Joe Pine on the Evolution of the Economic Model

Jan 24, 2019

Joe Pine, coauthor of The Experience Economy and the brand new book Infinite Possibility, joins us on Edgewise to explain the balance between commoditization and customization in progression of economic value. Amazon and Wal-Mart are just two companies that have used transformation as a tool to successfully guide customers to change by using their experiences. Companies such as these are commoditizing goods so they can sell at higher volume and lower cost to the consumer. He outlines three phases of transformations that are required to sustain transformations through time, which include diagnosis, using a set of experiences, and following through. Not only are these transformations crucial to a business setting but can be useful in our personal lives as well.

Geoff Vuleta on Creating Innovation for the Future

Jan 24, 2019

Geoff Vuleta, CEO of Fahrenheit 212, an “innovating consultancy firm,” joins us on Edgewise to share some of his companies' methods of creativity and innovation. He describes two types of innovation: renovation innovation, which is the bulk of all innovation efforts, and transformational innovation, which is, simply, just everything else. You will also learn how to use these tools to help overcome a road block and spark an idea to begin creating.

Dan Hendrix on Leveraging the Benefits of Sustainability

Jan 24, 2019

Dan Hendrix, president and CEO of Interface Incorporated, joins us on Edgewise to discuss sustainability in regards to the transformation of his company Interface. Hendrix has been working steadily since 1994 to eliminate any negative environmental footprint from Interface by the year 2020. He and the late CEO Ray C. Anderson implemented specific business initiatives that helped reduce Interface’s environmental impact, including: eliminating waste, dematerializing the product, and using green energy. These changes have led not only to a more sustainable company but also to one whose employees are proud and motivated to work for.

Bill Conaty on Diversifying and Developing Your Skill Sets in an Ever-Changing Workplace

Jan 24, 2019

Bill Conaty, former Senior VP of General Electric, sheds light on the qualities attributed to The Talent Masters , those individuals or companies who see talent development as a competitive edge and gave Bill the title for his book. In this episode of Edgewise, Bill explains that it is important to be able to learn and conform to change, offer the widest range of skills sets as possible, and seek out opportunities in lateral skill development over promotional moves. Listen and learn about the processes and assessment systems necessary to attract, develop, and retain world class talent.

Winter Nie and William Dowell on Chinese Expansion

Jan 24, 2019

Foxconn, a Chinese factory that produces Apple's, among other's, products, made a lot of news this year due to allegedly appalling working conditions and low wages. According to Winter Nie and William Dowell, authors of the new AMACOM book In the Shadow of the Dragon, the negative assessment was based on comparisons to American factories. Yet, compared to the average factory in China, Foxconn's working conditions are better than average and the pay is competitive. Nie and Dowell speak about misconceptions about China and how China is emerging as the new competitive business force of the world.

Thomas Davenport on Keeping Up with the Quants

Jan 24, 2019

Thomas Davenport, business analytics expert, believes that analytics are an important decision-making tool for all levels of an organization. Everyone has received credit card offers in the mail from Capital One but not everyone realizes that our response to those offers is carefully monitored. If a 12.9% balance transfer offer doesn't generate a response, soon a 12.8 offer will arrive in the mail. If a red envelope doesn't get someone's attention, soon a blue envelope will arrive. Capital One doesn't stop there, continuing to keep track of their customers so they know that it is a valued customer on the phone to close their account and that they should be transferred to a customer service specialist right away who can make deals and keep the customer. This focus on analytics, even on the front-side of the company, has returned more value to Capital One shareholders than any other company in the United States. This is just one example of a company using analytics to help make faster, more informed decisions.

Nicole Lipkin on Engagement and Emotional Contagion

Jan 24, 2019

 Nicole Lipkin, author of What Keeps Leaders Up at Night, wants us to know that our brains are more sensitive than we think, susceptible to what is called "emotional contagion." That's when someone's "negative emotions spread virally" where our brains pick up on someone else's mood and mimic that emotion. That means if one employee is feeling disengaged, that feeling will spread. Added to the other symptoms like declines in productivity, performance, safety, retention and profits, this makes disengagement one of the most pervasive and unremarked upon problems in the workplace. Luckily, Nicole has ways to combat disengagement and get teams back on track.

Cheryl Nash on the Highs and Lows of Financial Services

Jan 24, 2019

This week, Cheryl Nash talks about her perceived challenges of being a woman in a traditionally male-dominated industry, what qualities exemplify a great leader regardless of gender, and how she learned from her failures and how it helped her in her career. Instrumental to her leadership was the example of other mentors who were inspiring examples. Cheryl also talks about how fortunate she was to have the total support of her family and how her circumstances allowed her to withstand the mistakes and successes of her career.

Chip Bell on Knock Your Socks Off Service

Jan 24, 2019

Chip Bell, author of Managing Knock Your Socks Off Service, discusses the changes in customer service and the traditional ideas of the customer. With the arrival of new technologies such as the Internet, customers are now more frugal then ever and expect their shopping experience to be top-notch. Internal company relationships tend to affect how the company interacts with their customers, which has led to the trend of employers hiring employees who are knowledgeable about the products they sell.

Shoya Zichy on the Power of Personality

Jan 24, 2019

Shoya Zichy, author of Personality Power, discusses the Color Q system, a personality identification system that can be used in your personal and professional life. The Color Q system is used to determine the needs, values, and special talent of each of the four temperament groups, and what strategies to use when dealing with each group. Are you a Gold? Goal oriented, grounded, and realistic. A Red? Action orientated, and focused on the now. A Blue? Theoretical, and knowledge driven. Or maybe you are a Green? Empathetic, and expressive. Enjoy work, life, and boost your career by knowing which group you fit into and what environment caters to your strengths. Learn more on building a diverse team to maximize creativeness, or find complementary group to speed up workflow and unify project vision.

Ben Waber on New Ways to Track Productivity

Jan 24, 2019

To increase productivity, how many seats should be at the cafeteria table? Before, the best answer was a guess or simply "who cares?" However, in an increasingly knowledge-work and collaboration-focused world, factors like who you sit with at lunch and who you chat with in the hallway start to matter. Ben Waber has devised a new and possibly controversial system that will keep track of these unofficial meetings that actually lead to greater productivity and innovation.

Brad Karsh and Courtney Templin on What Millennials Want (and You Do Too)

Jan 24, 2019

Millennials, people who where born from 1981 to 2000, are starting to fill more and more management positions but older generations still find them hard to understand and even harder to work with. Most millennials have a very different approach to management: They are used to leaderless groups where everyone collaborates in an open environment. They believe that the answer is out there but it doesn’t necessary have to come from a leader or from management. To them, sometimes the best solutions come from the very people they are leading. Brad Karsh and Courtney Templin, authors of the book Manager 3.0, talk about what makes a millennial tick: how they think and which environments are conducive to success, not just for millennials but for the whole organization.

Dennis Perkins on Sailing Directly Into the Storm

Jan 24, 2019

In his new book Into the Storm, published by AMACOM, Dennis Perkins recalls the story of the AFR Midnight Rambler in the 1998 Sydney to Hobart Ocean Race. This race was the most perilous to date as a sudden storm stuck and took the lives of six sailors on the Rambler. However the other 55 sailors were rescued resulting in the largest search and rescue mission in Australian history. The AFR Midnight Rambler was not the biggest or the most well-equipped ship but due to its unified crew it found a way not only to overcome the horrible storm but also to win the overall race. These skills translate to the business world as well. Even in the worst of situations whether your business is facing a massive change or you’re in a race staring down a major storm, a unified team can just pull of the seemingly impossible.

Morton Mandel on Hiring "A Employees"

Jan 24, 2019

CEO of Parkwood Corp, chairman and CEO of the Jack, Joseph, and Morton Mandel Foundation, Morton Mandel has reached great success in both his financial and personal life. In his book It's All About Who You Hire, How They Lead, . . . and Other Essential Advice from a Self-Made Leader, Morton talks about his humble beginnings, from working a summer job for his uncle in the wholesale auto parts business to owning that same business with his brothers in July 1940. Though Morton joined the Army in World War II and left the business world behind him, it wasn’t until after the war that Morton and his brothers took a hard look at why their business was struggling to turn a major profit. Morton and his brothers realized that in an oversaturated market you have to come up with a different solution to attract customers; that sometimes business owners need to take a step back to see what their customers really need. What they learned propelled them into the future to live richer lives both monetarily and in the quality of life. Now Morton shares what he has learned about what a CEO is worth and how to hire and maintain “A employees.”

Haydn Shaw on the Influx of the New Generation

Jan 24, 2019

There has been a recent influx of new Gen-X workers, causing much confusion in the workplace for the older generations. Hadyn Shaw, author of the book Sticking Point, analyzes some of the points of aggravation that causes friction in the workplace when working with such broad generational gap. One major point of contention is the style of training and learning each generation expects. While seminars and training workshops are the main sources of learning for the older generations, Gen-X are used to finding answers on the Internet and demand lectures to be funny or informative. Listen for why each generation think they way they do and how to successfully clear the lines of communication within your business.

Nolan Bushnell on Innovation Stagnation

Jan 24, 2019

Nolan Key Bushnell, founder of Atari, and the Chuck E. Cheese's Pizza-Time Theaters, reveals some of the main ideas in his new book Finding the Next Steve Jobs. Nolan warns that innovation stagnation affects all business, not just traditionally "creative" companies but even tech giants like Nokia. Once it ruled over 70% of the phone industry but had its market taken away by Blackberry when Nokia failed to come out with a competitor. One of the biggest concerns is that innovation breaks some of the traditional rules that business hold dear. Nolan talks about how business need to let go of some of the control that it once held and give it back to the workers to truly unleash innovation.

Rod Collins on Wiki Management

Jan 24, 2019

In a world shifting from command and control to networks, managers have to adapt their expectations while still keeping their employees accountable. The three most important areas are what Rod Collins calls The Three M's: Managers, Meetings, & Measures. By resetting expectations of  these three components of the workplace managers can become facilitators and meetings become highly functional dialogs instead of debates. Making some small changes to tip the organization into a more networked style is the key to Collins's advice in his new book, published by AMACOM, Wiki Management: A Revolutionary Model for a Rapidly Changing and Collaborative World.

William Cohen on Peter Drucker and Practicality

Jan 24, 2019

Peter Drucker is a renowned thought leader in the business world. While his name is synonymous with management theory, sometimes it takes some work to turn that theory into practice. Enter William Cohen, former student and protegee of Peter Drucker himself. His new book The Practical Drucker, published by AMACOM, is a guide on how to take Drucker's idealistic statements and turn them into real management practice.

Alex Frankel on Working Undercover at America’s Top Companies

Jan 24, 2019

Curious to know just what happens behind the "employees only" doors of big companies, journalist Alex Frankel embarked on an undercover reporting project to find out how some of America's well-known companies win the hearts and minds of their retail and service employees.

Punching In (HarperCollins, 2007) chronicles his two-year urban adventure through the world of commerce. Frankel applied for and was hired by a half-dozen companies: he proudly wore the brown uniform of the UPS driver, folded endless stacks of T-shirts at Gap, brewed espressos for the hordes at Starbucks, interviewed (but failed to get hired) at Whole Foods, enrolled in management training at Enterprise Rent-A-Car, and sold iPods at the Apple Store. In this lively and entertaining narrative, Frankel takes readers on a personal journey into the land of front-line employees to discover why some workers are so eager to drink the corporate Kool-Aid and which companies know how to serve it up best.

Alex Frankel is a writer and brand observer based in San Francisco, California. Besides Punching In, he is author of WORDCRAFT (2004) and has written for Fast Company, The New York Times Magazine, Wired and Outside. He works with clients through his consulting firm, Ground Level Research.

Alex Tapscott on the Blockchain Revolution

Jan 24, 2019

You've probably heard of bitcoin, probably as a means of payment for shady business deals. Bitcoin is about to get a lot more legit as the ways of ensuring cyber security and trust become more and more evolved. Alex Tapscott, author of Blockchain Revolution, joins us to talk about this emerging technology that's about to be adapted to all aspects of our online lives.

Alexandra Levit on Harnessing the Next Generation Workforce

Jan 24, 2019

Alexandra Levit is the author of They Don't Teach Corporate in College, a practical guide that delivers the vital information junior corporate employees need to succeed in today's tough business climate. As the founder of the career consultancy Inspiration at Work, Alexandra advises both companies and individuals on harnessing the potential of the twentysomething generation. She has two books due out next year, How'd You Score THAT Gig? and Solving the Talent Equation. In this week's You've Been Spotted segment, Kevin Lee interviews AMA seminar participants about their experiences working with interns, college graduates, and other young professionals that are just getting started in the workplace.

Alison Green on Difficult Conversations as a Kindness

Jan 24, 2019

After 11 years of writing the popular and informative Ask a Manager blog, Alison Green has seen it all, from dramatic exit interviews to the myriad ways our coworkers can get on our nerves. Throughout all the advice there seemed to be a common refrain: just talk about it. Now she's written a book called Ask a Manager, filled with advice and scripts for how to deal with issues at work, from the mundane to the extreme.

Allen Adamson and Joel Steckel and the Increasing Rate of Change

Jan 24, 2019

"What's your five year plan?" It's a classic interview question that just isn't relevant anymore, now that the market landscape can be radically different within months, never mind years. Allen Adamson and Joel Steckel, authors of the new book Shift Ahead, join us to talk about companies and brands that shifted their whole worldview to make sure they stayed relevant.

Allen Gannett on Encouraging Your Creative Curve

Jan 24, 2019

The myth of the lone creative genius is "wildly destructive" says Allen Gannett, not to put too fine a point on it. Our guest today talks about how we need to bring our ideas about inspiration out of the clouds and back to a much more encouraging and attainable reality. In a world of increasing automation, our creativity is our most valuable asset.

Andrew Faas on the True Face of Bullying

Jan 24, 2019

Bullying is still a hot topic, one even world leaders are weighing in on. However, bullying looks different in the workplace than it does on the playground, more subtle and insidious. Some workplace cultures even encourage bullying behavior. Andrew Faas has some tips on how to identify bullying and what to do when you discover it.

Bonnie Hagemann on Leading with Vision

Jan 24, 2019

Being an inspiring leader seems like an innate quality that some people are just born with. However, it can be taught. Bonnie Hagemann, co-author of Leading with Vision, joins us with some tips on how to get buy-in from your team and become a visionary leader.

Andrew Miller on Redefining Operational Excellence

Jan 24, 2019

In Redefining Operational Excellence: New Strategies for Maximizing Performance and Profits Across the Organization, Andrew Miller explains operational excellence not as a methodology, but rather a mindset which he describes as a constant pursuit to try and improve performance and maximize profitability. Miller argues that the business environment, as well as customer expectations, are changing, and that the keys to success are to figure out how to attract and retain the best people, the ability to drive innovation and collaboration, and to acquire new customers, all while optimizing speed. Miller suggests that companies constantly be looking for “nuggets of gold” that are greatly benefiting the company as well as areas in need of performance boosts. Miller firmly believes that improving execution, fostering innovation, and driving growth are the three fundamental concepts for obtaining operational excellence.

Andy Sernovitz on successful word of mouth marketing

Jan 24, 2019

Andy Sernovitz is co-founder and former CEO of the Word of Mouth Marketing Association, an organization that uses the latest innovations in blogs and buzz to build a prosperous word of mouth marketing profession, based on best practices, measurable ROI and ethical leadership.

Anelia Varela on Better Business Writing

Jan 24, 2019

Most industry writing is, let's face it, boring. Anelia Varela, US Director of The Writer, has made it her mission to change that. Listen in for her tips on how to make your business writing simpler, more effective, and stand out from all your competition. Also make sure to check out the archive of our on-demand webcast with Anelia!

Anne Bahr Thompson on Brand Citizenship

Jan 24, 2019

Customers these look to brands to solve their own personal problems and also work towards solving wider global concerns: they want the paper towels that will clean up messes in the kitchen and also made sustainably so they don't destroy the environment. Anne Bahr Thompson, author of Do Good: Embracing Brand Citizenship to Fuel Both Purpose and Profit, is here to talk about aligning your purpose and your brand to win more customers but also to improve the world.

Anne Marie Knott on Measuring Your Company's IQ

Jan 24, 2019

We know people can be measured on a scale on intelligence, but what if we could do the same for businesses? Our guest Anne Marie Knott has done just that. She's here to talk about her RQ scale and how she uses it to measure the innovation output for companies worldwide.

Brian Cole Miller on Simple Steps for Boosting Team Performance

Jan 24, 2019

Just because a team is friendly doesn't make it a good team; they have to get work done too! Sometimes truly talking through differing opinions can lead to better ideas and solutions. In his latest book, Nice Teams Finish Last, Brian Cole Miller tells us how to say no and stop trying to please everyone.

Bruce Barry on Free Speech in the Workplace

Jan 24, 2019

In his new book Speechless, Bruce Barry critiques a legal system that gives employers wide latitude to suppress worker expression, and argues that freedom of speech in the workplace is excessively and needlessly limited. Barry advocates changes to the law and to management practice that would expand employees' expressive rights without jeopardizing the legitimate interests of employers.

Bruce Barry is Professor of Management and Sociology at Vanderbilt University, where he teaches courses on power and influence in organizations, business and society, negotiation, and the sociology of media and technology.

In this weeks You've Been Spotted segment, Kevin Lee interviews participants from AMA's course "Mastering Challenging Management Conversations". Listen to these participants share their insights on managing difficult workplace situations.

Carmine Gallo on Storytelling

Jan 24, 2019

At Cisco employees aren't promoted above a certain level unless they've shown, with quantifiable data, that they're able to connect with their customers. Not every company is this extreme but being able to connect with coworkers, vendors, and customers is crucial to success at work. Carmine Gallo is here to talk about his new book and how being able to tell a great and compelling story is a key skill in today's workplace.

Carmine Gallo on the Power of Communicating Well

Jan 24, 2019

You don't have to be giving a TED talk to benefit from learning how to speak and tell stories well. Whether you're pitching a new project to your team or pitching yourself to an employer during an interview, the people who tell the best story see the best results. Carmine Gallo, author of Five Stars: The Communication Secrets to Get from Good to Great joins us to talk about how good communication is vital not matter what your level in your company.

Cass Sunstein on Getting Past Groupthink

Jan 24, 2019

Cass Sunstein defines "groupthink" as "when you have a group of people whose members don’t disclose what they actually know" and instead make a decision based on what they think is popular to the group as a whole. This conformity can be disastrous. Luckily Sunstein is here to talk about his new book Wiser: Getting Beyond Groupthink to Make Groups Smarter and how to make informed decisions.

Charles Handy on Eudaemonia and Other Important Matters

Jan 24, 2019

Charles Handy is often referred to as Britain's greatest management thinker. He has written some of the most influential management articles and books of the past 30 years, including The Age of Unreason, The Elephant and the Flea, The Future or Work, and The Age of Paradox. In his latest book, Myself and Other More Important Matters (AMACOM), Handy shares his special brand of wisdom, giving readers uncommon insight into business and careers...as well as the choices we all have to make in our lives. Handy draws on the lessons of his own experience to help readers move beyond the facts they learned in business school and reflect on their own individual management style. With the "philosophical elegance and eloquence" Warren Bennis has described as his trademark, Handy discusses how one should develop one's career goals in line with personal values and sense of ethics. Handy entertainingly recounts what he's discovered along his own international journey: from lessons his father taught him growing up in Ireland...to what he learned in Borneo in his days working for Royal Dutch Shell... to Italy, where he bought and fixed up an old house in Tuscany...all the way to America, where recent corporate scandals have shaken our understanding of what is ethical and acceptable. Mr. Handy worked for Royal Dutch Shell International in South-East Asia and London and then entered the Sloan School of Management at MIT. He then helped to start the London Business School and later became warden of St. George's House at Windsor Castle, managing a program bringing together captains of industry, trade union leaders, civil servants, politicians, bishops and chaplains to discuss issues in society and to trade ideas. Today, Mr. Handy works on writing projects while moving between bases in England and Italy. Myself and Other More Important Matters is AMACOM's featured book for February. In this week's You've Been Spotted, Kevin Lee talks with AMACOM editors Ellen Kadin and Barry Richardson about two other noteworthy titles: No Limit: The Texas Hold 'em Guide to Winning in Business by Donald G. Krause and Jeff Carter, and Speak to Win: How to Present With Power in Any Situation by Brian Tracy

Chester Elton and Adrian Gostick on The Best Team Wins

Jan 24, 2019

We're back! After a short break we're back with a lineup of exciting guests we're excited to share with you. First, back from our hiatus, old friends of the AMA, The Carrot Guys: Chester Elton and Adrian Gostick. They're here to share some of their favorite stories of teamwork success from their new book, The Best Team Wins.

Chester Elton on "Carrot" style motivation

Jan 24, 2019

Long-term organizational success is almost impossible without effective recognition of employees. Chester Elton explains the remarkably simple but powerful methods great managers use to provide their employees with effective recognition, which all managers can easily learn and begin practicing for immediate results. Chester Elton is vice president of performance recognition with the O.C. Tanner Recognition Company, the world's leading employee recognition firm. Elton is co-author (with Adrian Gostick) of The Carrot Principle.

Chris Yeh and Ben Casnocha on the Employee's Tour of Duty

Jan 24, 2019

In the book The Alliance: Managing Talent in the Networked Age authors Chris Yeh and Ben Casnocha, along with Reid Hoffman talk about the relationship between managers and employees and why an alliance-style of communication between the two parties is the most beneficial. They refer to this style as the “Tour of Duty” Model. This type of communication consists of a mission objective, which gives the employee a better understanding of what he or she is trying to accomplish. Managers and employees can use this objective as a tool to determine what each party will eventually attain at the conclusion of the process. One of the most important aspects of the tour of duty model is to set a realistic time period over which the objective gets completed. Another interesting topic discussed in the book is how companies use their employees as “nodes” to gather information about the outside business industry. This can be done by observing other professional’s connections and networks. Yeh and Casnocha believe this can be done by using in-depth networking to maintain up to date company alumni relations. These alumni can help in recruiting, giving feedback, and in referring business.

 

Chris Yeh is the VP Marketing for PBworks, co-founder and General Partner of Wasabi Ventures, and has been working with high-tech startups since 1995. He has written over 2,000 posts on topics ranging from the psychology of entrepreneurship to achieving happiness in Silicon Valley. Previously, he was the first investor in and interim CEO of Ustream.TV.

Dan Schawbel on How Old School is New School Again

Jan 24, 2019

The last time Dan Schawbel was here he talked about the wonders of technology. Now he's returned to tell you to back off of your screens. In his new book Back to Human he argues we're suffering from a loss of human connection, it's time to get out there face to face and connect with our coworkers, friends, and family once again.

Danielle Harlan on The New Alpha

Jan 24, 2019

Being the alpha dog is everyone's goal right? But if you think about the alphas in your organization, they're usually not someone you like very much. Danielle Harlan has seen a rise in what she calls the New Alpha, the kinder, more impactful leader.

David Allen on Managing Your Attention

Jan 24, 2019

David Allen, author of Getting Things Done, uses lists so he doesn't have to make a plan. This may seem counter-intuitive but it's actually extremely intuitive thinking. As soon as something crosses your mind it it best to deal with it immediately in the most appropriate way. Most of the time that means writing an action item down on a list to do later. But addressing thoughts as they occur to you, even if that just means acknowledging it and planning on saving it for later, frees up your mind so the real critical thinking can be done on issues that really matter.

David Braun on Mergers and Acquisitions

Jan 24, 2019

You've probably seen Pretty Woman, Wall Street, or Working Girl and think you have an idea of how mergers and acquisitions work: a big scary company comes to buy a small company and sell it for scrap. David Braun, founder and CEO of Capstone, is here to tell you that is so outside the realm of reality "you could actually call it science fiction." He joins us on Edgewise to bust some more myths about how mergers and acquisitions work from both sides of the table.

David Robertson on the Power of Little Ideas

Jan 24, 2019

What do LEGOs and lingerie have in common? More than you probably think. David Robertson, author of the new book The Power of Little Ideas, is here to talk about how both LEGO and Victoria's Secret (and others) made small changes that made them the leaders of their industry while still staying true to their core product.

Deb Bright on Learning to Love Criticism

Jan 24, 2019

In The Truth Doesn't Have to Hurt: How to Use Criticism to Strengthen Relationships, Improve Performance, and Promote Change author Deb Bright talks about “criticism's” bad reputation and the stigma that is attached to it in the workplace. She argues that criticism is actually more beneficial than not and that its sole purpose is to help someone do something better, achieve goals, and grow personally and professionally. The purpose of the book, Bright says, is to give givers and receivers of criticism the skills they need in order to communicate with one another, and have productive conversations that build trust and respect. Deb gives listeners techniques such as “quick charges” in order to better help them receive criticism and utilize it in the best way possible.

Devora Zack on Singletasking

Jan 24, 2019

Devora Zack wants you to stop multi-tasking right now. In fact, you weren't even multi-tasking, you were task-switching. Moving from one project to another always requires a mental reset and even if it's only momentary those moments add up and take time out of your day. Instead, put all your energy into one task at a time. You'll get more work done better by doing what Devora calls Singletasking.

Diane Mulcahy on the Gig Economy

Jan 24, 2019

In today's economy the best way to stay relevant is to diversify your skills and take on small, one-time jobs. It's not about the extra cash, it's about staying relevant. Diane Mulcahy, author of the AMACOM book The Gig Economy, joins us to talk about reasons you should be cultivating your side-hustle.

Dick Grote on Disciplining without Punishment

Jan 24, 2019

Dick Grote speaks on how to get problem employees to take responsibility for their behavior and how to solve attitude, attendance, and performance problems successfully, without resorting to punishment In his book Discipline without Punishment (AMACOM), Grote helps managers and HR professionals adopt a positive, proven method for getting problem employees back on track. Dick is Chairman and CEO of Grote Consulting Corp., and the author of The Complete Guide to Performance Appraisal, The Performance Appraisal Question and Answer Book, and Forced Ranking: Making Performance Management Work. His articles have appeared in Harvard Business Review, The Wall Street Journal, and many other publications.

Dick Martin on Rebuilding Brand America

Jan 24, 2019

In his book Rebuilding Brand America (AMACOM), Dick Martin argues that in today's global economy, American companies can no longer afford to overlook how anti-American sentiment affects their business. He then looks at how some of America's best companies have risen to this challenge, and in doing so have thrived in international markets while being recognized as ambassadors of goodwill across the world. Dick was excecutive vice president of public relations, employee communications and brand management for AT&T. He has published articles in The Harvard Business Review and other media, and is the author of Tough Calls.

Donald and Jim Kirkpatrick on the Four Levels of Effective Training

Jan 24, 2019

The Kirkpatrick four-level evaluation model focuses on four key areas: reaction, learning, behavior and results - with each successive level representing a more precise measure of the effectiveness of a training program. Listen to the Kirkpatricks as they walk through each step of the model and describe its practical application to the business environment. As Professor Emeritus at the University of Wisconsin, Donald L. Kirkpatrick, Ph.D., is a former national president of the American Society for Training and Development and regularly conducts evaluation workshops for ASTD and other organizations in both the private and public sectors. He has consulted on management training and development to a wide range of companies including Blockbuster, Caterpillar, Coca-Cola, Eastman Kodak, GE, Honeywell, IBM, Johnson Wax, Kemper Insurance, the Mayo Foundation, and the U.S. Civil Service Commission. His books include Evaluating Training Programs: The Four Levels and Implementing the Four Levels: A Practical Guide for Effective Evaluation of Training Programs. He was elected to the HRD Hall of Fame in 1997. James D. Kirkpatrick, Ph.D., is a vice president, for First Indiana Bank in Indianapolis Indiana. He is also director of the corporate university. He is an adjunct professor in the MBA program at the Indiana School of Technology, member of cofounder of the downtown Indianapolis Organizational Development Network, and is on the Board of Directors for the American Red Cross. He has written a number of books, including Transferring Learning to Behavior: Using the Four Levels to Improve Performance and Implementing the Four Levels: A Practical Guide for Effective Evaluation of Training Programs.

Donna Hicks on Leading with Dignity

Jan 24, 2019

We're all born with inherent dignity. However, according to Dr. Donna Hicks, author of the new book Leading with Dignity, many of us have to be trained to learn how to recognize when we're being treated with dignity and when we are not. She joins us to talk about ways we as leaders can extend not just respect but dignity to those around us.

Dr Albert Siu on Difficult Conversations as a Manager

Jan 24, 2019

One of the most difficult conversations at work is when you've got an employee who is under-performing. Albert Siu joins us with some tips on how to get through that conversation so everyone is happy, plus other advice for managers both new and experienced.

Dr. David Livermore on Effective Diversity

Jan 24, 2019

Diversity leads to innovation but it doesn't happen magically. It's about more than just getting people into the same room, it's about creating an environment that fosters the free exchange of ideas. Dr. David Livermore, author of the new book Driven by Difference, published by AMACOM, is here to talk about how to foster an environment that nurtures ideas from all your people.

Dr. Leah Weiss on Working with Compassion

Jan 24, 2019

Wish you could find more purpose and meaning in your work? Dr. Leah Weiss, author of How We Work, has techniques to shift your mindset away from work as a transaction of trading time for money and toward something more positive and motivating in the long run.

H. James Wilson on Work in the Age of AI

Jan 24, 2019

No, you are not going to be replaced by a robot but a robot might be your new coworker. While automation is here to stay, research has shown that human and machine collaboration consistently outperforms pure automation. H. James Wilson, author of Human + Machine, joins us to talk about the future of the working world.

Herminia Ibarra on Acting Like a Leader

Jan 24, 2019

Herminia Ibarra is the Cora Chaired Professor of Leadership and Learning, and Professor of Organizational Behavior at INSEAD. Prior to joining INSEAD she served on the Harvard Business School faculty for thirteen years. She is a member of the World Economic Forum Global Agenda Councils, a judge for the Financial Times and McKinsey Business Book of the Year Award, and Chairs the Visiting Committee of the Harvard Business School. Thinkers 50 ranked Ibarra #9 among the most influential business gurus in the world.

Holiday Double: Living Rewired and Defeating Distraction

Jan 24, 2019

For your holiday listening enjoyment, Edgewise presents a double episode featuring two outstanding interviews on a critical issue: how our ability to think and focus is being radically altered in the Information Age.   Hooked up to the Internet's global computing grid, massive information processing plants are pumping data and software code into our homes and businesses. It's a revolution of the kind that hasn't been seen since electricity became a household utility. Nicholas Carr's new book The Big Switch examines the promise and the perils of this transformation.   In Distracted, Maggie Jackson warns that modern society's inability to focus heralds an impending Dark Age-an era historically characterized by the decline of a civilization amid abundance and technological advancement. Jackson posits that our near-religious allegiance to a constant state of motion and addiction to multitasking are eroding our capacity for deep, sustained, perceptive attention-the building block of intimacy, wisdom and cultural progress and stunting society's ability to comprehend what's relevant and permanent.   A former executive editor of the Harvard Business Review, Nicholas Carr writes and speaks on technology, business, and culture. His 2004 book Does IT Matter?, published by Harvard Business School Press, set off a worldwide debate about the role of computers in business. His widely acclaimed new book, The Big Switch: Rewiring the World, from Edison to Google, examines the rise of "cloud computing" and its implications for business, media and society.   Maggie Jackson is an award-winning author and journalist known for her penetrating coverage of U.S. social issues. She writes the popular "Balancing Acts" column in the Sunday Boston Globe, and her work has also appeared in The New York Times, Gastronomica and on National Public Radio.

Howard Behar on Committing to a Great Culture

Jan 24, 2019

A lot of people pay lip service to culture or say they'll work on getting a great culture later. According to Howard Behar there is no later, the time for great culture is now. The former president of Starbucks is here to motivate you to create a mission statement to improve your daily work for your team and your company today.

Jack Stahl on Frameworks for Successful Leadership

Jan 24, 2019

Jack Stahl became a top executive of two world-famous corporations - Cola Cola and Revlon - before the age of 50. In his book Lessons on Leadership, Stahl offers the down to earth approach to business leadership that fueled his meteoric rise through the corporate ranks. Stahl organizes his leadership guidelines into seven categories, what he calls his "Frameworks for Success." His practical solutions empower leaders to manage the critical issues they encounter every day and develop business skills for a lifetime of success.

Howard Behar on the Secret of Starbucks’ Success

Jan 24, 2019

After a working life spent building Starbucks from a chain of 28 stores to an international coffee business through positions such as executive vice president of sales, founding president of Starbucks International and president of Starbucks North America, Howard Behar tells of the strategies he used to establish the business into the success it is today. Following the release of his book It's Not About the Coffee, Behar shares the soft skills that helped to construct the company from a regional outlet to a corporation with international reach.Howard Behar is the former president of Starbucks Coffee Company North America and Starbucks Coffee International. He joined Starbucks in 1989 when the company had just begun to venture outside the Northwest region. Initially serving as vice president of sales and operations, he grew the retail business from 28 stores to more than 400 stores by the time he was named president of Starbucks Coffee International in 1995. Under Behar's leadership, Starbucks opened its first location in Tokyo in 1996. Following this historic opening, over the next three years he introduced the Starbucks brand across Asia and the United Kingdom. After a two-year hiatus, he returned to Starbucks as President of Starbucks North America until his retirement in January 2003. He has been a director of the Company since 1996.

Josh Spodek on the Steps to Leadership

Jan 24, 2019

You wouldn't learn how to play piano by starting with musical theory. Leadership training is exactly the same. Josh Spodek is here to talk about his new book, Leadership Step by Step, published by AMACOM, the book that will get you out there to start practicing leadership in the real world.

Howard Guttman on Building High-Performance Teams

Jan 24, 2019

Standout performance is what it takes to be a top business team. In Great Business Teams, Howard Guttman examines the inner workings of over 30 business teams, at top-management, business-unit, and functional levels, to offer a radically new vision of the emerging horizontal organization and of the high-performing teams that are the cornerstone of its success. Using an impressive array of real-life examples drawn from his extensive consulting experience and research, Guttman isolates five key factors that drive up team performance and, in the process, challenges prevailing notions of team leadership, membership, accountability, decision making, and conflict, replacing them with a fresh and dynamic approach to achieving better results. Howard M. Guttman is Principal of Guttman Development Strategies, Inc. (GDS), a New Jersey-based management consulting firm specializing in building high-performance teams, executive coaching, and strategic and operational alignment. GDS works primarily with senior management at companies such as Chico's FAS, Inc.; Colgate-Palmolive; John Hancock; Johnson & Johnson; Liz Claiborne; L'Oreal USA; Mars Inc.; Novartis; PepsiCo; and Philip Morris USA.

Howard Yu on Leaping Across Knowledge Disciplines

Jan 24, 2019

Novartis is currently a multinational pharmaceutical company but when it started over two centuries ago they were manufacturing dyes for textiles. It was only when someone noticed the health benefits of their dyes that they made the switch. Howard Yu, author of Leap, joins us to talk about how this leap to a similar but different industries as the key to staying relevant in an constantly changing business market.

Isaac Sacolick on Driving Digital

Jan 24, 2019

Digital is the way of the future no matter what your industry. Usually that switch comes with a lot of frightening language: transition, revolution, transformation. It doesn't have to be that scary. Isaac Sacolick, author of the new book Driving Digital, published by AMACOM, is here to assure you that digital is going to happen and it's going to be ok.

Jack Mitchell on Why You Should Hug People at Work

Jan 24, 2019

We work in a 21st century world where email has replaced conversation, call centers have decamped to India and help lines have turned into a series of automated messages. And while many of us are habitually reaching for our cellphones and blackberries, there remains a part of us that longs for a little, old fashioned human interaction. Jack Mitchell, co-owner of several well-known and family owned clothing stores is on a crusade to bring back the good, old fashioned hug. His new book, Hug Your People, is poised to continue the revolution that his first title "Hug Your Customers" began five years ago when it became a Wall Street Journal bestseller.

Jackie Barretta on Primal Teams

Jan 24, 2019

Jackie Barretta, author of Primal Teams, published by AMACOM, wants you to know that emotions do belong at work. You want people who are positively emotional about a project they're working on and are happy and motivated to do the work necessary. People think most creatively when they're in an optimal emotional state. However, emotions like fear and anger are primal emotions that take hold much faster than logic and reason. Instead of sweeping these emotions under the rug, acknowledge them head-on, confront the problem, and create a culture that encourages people to speak up.

James Kilts on Doing What Matters

Jan 24, 2019

James M. Kilts has led three major companies - Gillette, Nabisco, and Kraft -into prosperity by doing what matters on the fundamentals. In Doing What Matters, a vivid first-person account of his executive experiences, he reveals his system for success that is both cutting-edge and back-to-basics. Mr. Kilts has a worldwide and world-class reputation as a business leader. Dubbed a "brand mechanic" by The Wall Street Journal, he is especially well-known for reviving brands and turning around established companies like Nabisco and Gillette. He successfully integrated the Kraft and General Foods divisions within the Philip Morris Companies. As president and CEO at Nabisco, he revitalized several famous but flagging brands, introduced successful new brands, and gained market share for virtually every product line. He did the same thing as CEO of Gillette, increasing sales 5% in the first year and almost 10% in the next, and increasing stock price by 20% - then led Gillettes acquisition by Procter & Gamble. Currently, Mr. Kilts is a Founding Partner of Centerview Partners, a private equity and financial advisory firm.

John C. Maxwell on Living Intentionally

Jan 24, 2019

John C. Maxwell doesn't want you to set goals. Goals, once met, tend to stagnate. Even the process of setting a new goal takes up too much time. Instead, he wants you to be growth oriented. If you live your life with the intention of always being better, the results will get you further than any goal you set.

Josh Sullivan & Angela Zutavern on the Mathematical Corporation

Jan 24, 2019

Machine automation and AI are the way of the future. That might seem frightening but the leaders at the forefront of this movement have been working together to make sure AI is done right. Josh Sullivan & Angela Zutavern, authors of The Mathematical Corporation, join us with stories of exciting new collaborative innovation that is moving forward rapidly.

John C. Maxwell on the Irrefutable Laws of Leadership

Jan 24, 2019

Dr. John C. Maxwell is the founder of Maximum Impact, an Atlanta-based organization with a mission to develop leaders of excellence and integrity. Dr. Maxwell is author of more than 30 books with more than 7 million copies sold, including Failing Forward: Turning Your Failures into Stepping Stones for Success, The 21 Indispensable Qualities of a Leader, and The 21 Irrefutable Laws of Leadership. Many of his titles have landed on the best seller list in noted publications such as the New York Times, Business Week, Wall Street Journal, USA Today, and CBA Marketplace. In this week's "You've Been Spotted" segment, Kevin Lee interviews participants from AMA's Advanced Executive Leadership Program. Listen to them share how they strengthened the leadership values that matter most to them.

John Kotter on Adjusting Your Management Style

Jan 24, 2019

Complacency is a real problem in the workforce but panicking and crying wolf to combat it doesn't work. What John Kotter, author of That's Not How We Do It Here!, calls "sustained urgency" will eventually wear off and complacency will set in again. Instead, as research as shown, positive energy can be sustained over time without fading away. John has this and other tips for us on how to calibrate your management style to your company and the issues at hand.

John Kotter on Using Urgency to Your Advantage

Jan 24, 2019

Most organizational change initiatives fail spectacularly (at worst) or deliver lukewarm results (at best). In his international bestseller Leading Change, John Kotter revealed why change is so hard, and provided an actionable, eight-step process for implementing successful transformations. The book became the change bible for managers worldwide. Now, in his new book, A Sense of Urgency, Kotter shines the spotlight on the crucial first step in his framework: creating a sense of urgency by getting people to actually see and feel the need for change.

John Mariotti on Conquering the Complexity Crisis

Jan 24, 2019

In the quest to grow their business in flat or declining markets, many companies have created dozens of new products and services to increase their customer, vendor, and marketplace relationships. But even as top-line revenues go up, this rising tide of complexity is drowning bottom-line profits. In his book The Complexity Crisis, management consultant John L. Mariotti looks at how companies can truly evaluate their cost and management systems in order to clear away complexity--and conquer the competition. JOHN L. MARIOTTI is president and founder of the Enterprise Group, a coalition of executive advisors. As the former president of Rubbermaid Office Products Group, he led a multinational group of nine divisions in North America, Europe, Asia, and Australia. He's also a former management consultant and contributing editor for Industry Week magazine.

Johnny Taylor on Getting Good Hires Now

Jan 24, 2019

Even with the economy in a downturn, companies still need to invest in new talent. Johnny Taylor says that the race to find good talent is coming soon and smart employers are starting early.

Jonah Sachs on Unsafe Thinking

Jan 24, 2019

Sometimes the more we know, the more we fall into a trap. How many times have we shot down ideas because we know they haven't worked in the past. It's time to break out of that monotonous thinking. Jonah Sachs, author of Unsafe Thinking, joins us to talk about ways we can learn to think more creatively and stay ahead of the competition.

Joseph Badaracco on Managing in the Gray

Jan 24, 2019

When faced with a difficult decision, Joseph Badaracco wants you to gather information like a manager and make a decision like a human being. Meaning, there are plenty of processes to use to get to the bottom of a tricky situation but in the end you need to rely on your own best judgement, whether you're Tim Cook of Apple deciding whether or not to work with the US Government or you're a mid-level manager who might have to fire somebody. The author of Managing in the Gray joins us for some examples of other people who have had to rely on their own judgement when there weren't any answers in the employee handbook.

Joseph Grenny on Vital Behaviors for Positive Influence

Jan 24, 2019

Most of us stop trying to make change happen because we believe it is too difficult, if not impossible. We develop complicated coping strategies when we should be learning the tools and techniques of the world's most influential people. But this is about to change. From the best-selling author of Crucial Conversations comes Influencer, a thought-provoking book that combines the remarkable insights of behavioral scientists and business leaders with the astonishing stories of high-powered influencers from all walks of life.

Judith Bardwick on Defeating Apathy in the Workplace

Jan 24, 2019

After years of downsizing, outsourcing and corporate greed gone wild, today's workers believe that their company no longer values them. These vulnerable and resentful feelings affect as many as two-thirds of U.S. workers, who are either actively looking for new jobs or going through the motions at their current jobs. Fueled by bad management practices, this "psychological recession" can take a toll on your organization's bottom line. So what can we do about this problem? Drawing on what works for exceptional and profitable companies, Dr. Judith Bardwick has developed original ideas and specific strategies to regain the trust, commitment and engagement of your employees at every level. She has compiled her insights into a new book, One Foot Out the Door (AMACOM). In this book she reveals how you can increase commitment, get more from your people, magnify your bottom line, and replace the broken spirit at the heart of your company with engagement, the passionate sense of, "I'm in! Let's go!" Bardwick is a highly regarded writer, speaker and management consultant whose clients have included IBM, Hewlett-Packard and Johnson & Johnson. Prior to forming her consulting business in 1983, she was a professor and associate dean at the University of Michigan. She also served as a clinical professor of psychiatry at the University of California, San Diego. Dr. Bardwick has authored over 100 articles and books on a wide range of subjects, including optimizing individual and management effectiveness and performance, analyzing cultural views and values for positive change, developing leadership qualities, and facilitating the conditions necessary for psychological success at both the personal and corporate levels. A few of her published books include: One Foot Out the Door, Seeking the Calm in the Storm, and Danger in the Comfort Zone.

Karin Hurt and David Dye on Winning Well

Jan 24, 2019

At work there's winning and then there's winning well. What's the difference? It's about getting results without sacrificing your soul. Authors of the book Winning Well (published by AMACOM) Karin Hurt and David Dye are here to talk about how to maintain your core values while still getting great results at work.

Ken Gronbach on Population as a Market Trend

Jan 24, 2019

Robots will not replace us. Ken Gronbach is a demographer who has been proven right in the past and is here to assure us that automation is the future and also there will be enough jobs for humans. The world of work will change but there will always be a place for creative thinking.

Ken Gronbach on the Nuances of Generational Marketing

Jan 24, 2019

Ken Gronbach is a nationally recognized consultant and researcher on Demography and Generational Marketing. His new book Common Census: The Counterintuitive Guide to Intergenerational Marketing is about the radical changes affecting U.S. business, economy, and culture caused by massive population shifts from generation to generation. He shares his observations on how marketers can respond to these changes.

Kenny Nguyen on Making Interesting Presentations

Jan 24, 2019

We've all sat through really boring presentations. Kenny Nguyen's mission is to make sure that never happens again. He's here with some tips for how to prepare and present in an interesting way, so you never have to present a presentation you'd dread having to sit through yourself.

Lisa Bodell on Driving Innovation from Within

Jan 24, 2019

Innovation is critical to the success of both organizations and individuals. But does everyone have the ability to innovate? One company believes the answer is yes. Lisa Bodell is the founder and CEO of futurethink. Under her leadership, futurethink convenes a unique team of savvy businesspeople, award-winning creative strategists and members of elite futurist organizations to bring the power of progress into the reality of business. Clients such as Citigroup, Mastercard and Westin Hotels look to futurethink to develop their innovation efforts. In this week's You've Been Spotted segment, Kevin Lee interviews participants from AMA's course "Planning and Managing Organizational Change." Listen to these participants share practices, tips and guidelines they've learned from the course.

Liz Wiseman on Rookie Smarts

Jan 24, 2019

Sometimes being inexperienced is more valuable than having more knowledge. In an ever-changing world, it’s not what you know, but how fast you can learn it. Liz Wiseman, author of three best-selling books including her newest title, Rookie Smarts: Why Learning Beats Knowing in the New Game of Work, talks about the importance of being a rookie in this episode of AMA Edgewise.

Lois Kelly on Conversational Marketing

Jan 24, 2019

Lois Kelly is the author of "Beyond Buzz: The Next Generation of Word of Mouth Marketing". She's dedicated her career to helping companies talk about their companies and issues in ways that get people to buy, believe and change, no matter how complex the topic or how competitive the market. Clients have included SAP, Sun Microsystems, Sapient, FedEx, The Business Innovation Factory, Hyperion, eRoom, Copernicus, Orange, and SAS Institute. Her articles have appeared in USA Today, The Wall Street Journal, Brandweek, Advertising Age, and Adweek, and she frequently speaks at conferences on marketing and communications throughout the world. She is a board member of the Tony-award winning theater, Trinity Repertory Company, and is an advisor to Northeastern University's fast-growing Communications Studies program.

Lynda McDermott on Leading World Class Teams

Jan 24, 2019

In her book World Class Teams, Lynda McDermott provides a hands-on guide on how to develop, launch, lead, and evaluate world class teams. With her coauthors William Waite and Nolan Brawley, McDermott draws heavily from their experience with such international firms as Pfizer, Colgate, AT&T, and Motorola to give managers, executive training organizations, team leaders, and HR and OD specialists. She is president and CEO of EquiPro International. McDermott is an American Society of Training and Development award winner for her work in the creation and management of cross-functional global teams.

Lynne Waymon on Making the Most of Your Network

Jan 24, 2019

Lynne Waymon leads Contacts Count, a consulting and training firm for business and career networking. Her new book, Make Your Contacts Count (AMACOM), is a practical, step-by-step guide for creating, cultivating and capitalizing on networking opportunities and relationships.

Maciej Kranz on the Internet of Things

Jan 24, 2019

Maybe you’ve heard of the Internet of Things but don’t understand it’s potential to change business-life as we know it. Cisco Systems VP of Corporate Strategic Innovations Group, Maciej Kranz’s new book provides the baseline awareness and contextual framework for building that understanding. He spent a recent rainy afternoon in our studio answering questions only an IoT newbie could appreciate.

Marilyn Carlson Nelson on How We Lead Matters

Jan 24, 2019

As a daughter, wife, mother, and grandmother, Marilyn has always put people first. This multi-faceted woman also happens to be one of the most successful CEOs in the world. In this conversation, she shares her thoughts on the role of women in leadership and the importance of believing in yourself.

Mark Goulston on Just Listen

Jan 24, 2019

Mark Goulston, author of the new book Just Listen, published by AMACOM, joins us on Edgewise with some scripts and keywords to use to smooth out even the toughest conversations.

Mark Smith on Your Leadership Status

Jan 24, 2019

Mark Smith has worked in nearly 40 countries with hundreds of senior leaders of corporations, government organizations, non-profit foundations, and industry associations. His client list includes many of the most prominent multi-national companies and their most influential leaders. His business experience began with IBM in 1984, after which he held senior executive positions with growing firms in the United States, Hong Kong, Brazil, and Switzerland. He founded Leadership Resource Institute in 2010 to make leadership programs more accessible to emerging leaders around the world.

Mark Murphy on Making Feedback Bearable

Jan 24, 2019

Handling feedback, both giving and receiving, is one of the most difficult parts of office life. Mark Murphy, author of Truth at Work, has looked into the science of why we hate hearing feedback and has some ways we can deliver even the toughest messages in a way that will get through.

Marshall Goldsmith on How to Take Success to the Next Level

Jan 24, 2019

The corporate world is filled with executives, men and women who have worked hard for years to reach the upper levels of management. They're intelligent, skilled, and even charismatic, but only a handful of them will ever reach the pinnacle.

In his book What Got You Here Won't Get You There: How Successful People Become Even More Successful,  executive coach Marshall Goldsmith shows that subtle nuances make all the difference. These are small "transactional flaws" performed by one person against another (as simple as not saying "thank you" enough), which lead to negative perceptions that can hold any executive back.

Marshall Goldsmith is corporate America's preeminent executive coach, having worked with more than sixty CEOs at the world's leading corporations. He is on the faculty of the executive education programs at Dartmouth College and the University of Michigan.  He lives in Fairbanks Ranch, California.

Marvin Davis on a Take No Prisoners Approach to Excellence

Jan 24, 2019

Now more than ever, American companies are experiencing a nagging feeling that they could be doing much better. Globalization, digitization, and the development of cellular technology have increased competition by leaps and bounds. As a consequence, skating by on marginal performance isn’t enough. It’s time for businesses to find the tools that will help them excel. A turnaround expert, Marvin Davis has made a career out of transforming underperforming companies. He assesses their mistakes, issues a diagnosis, and has helped allay the fears of many CEOs across the country—leaving businesses more efficient and ultimately more competitive.

In Take No Prisoners, he gives hard-line, tough-love solutions to the real and difficult problems that hinder profitability. By addressing issues that may at first seem too messy or dangerous, companies can learn how to truly improve performance, increase profits, and boost cash flow. Companies shouldn’t wait until they are in dire straits to make changes; they can alleviate many problems if they act now and meet them head-on. Through real-life examples of corporations who have made these solutions work successfully, Take No Prisoners tells American companies the truth about the state of their business, and how to make it even better.

 

Maureen Chiquet on Going Beyond the Label

Jan 24, 2019

Being authentic is one of the most important leadership skills. It helps others connect with you and helps your own path become more clear when you’re at a crossroads. Maureen Chiquet, author of Beyond the Label, joins us to talk about her journey during her career and how she decided on the career path she took.

Michael Bungay Stanier on Coaching Well

Jan 24, 2019

Michael Bungay Stanier is a well-regarded speaker, and as well as speaking to organizations he regularly keynotes at conferences such as HRPA, SHRM, CSTD, the Evanta HR Leadership series and The Conference Board of Canada. He’s known for sessions that are highly engaging, interactive and entertaining. Before Box of Crayons, Michael spent time inventing products and services as part of an innovation agency, and working as a management consultant on large scale change, where amongst other things he wrote the global vision for GlaxoSmithKline. Michael was a Rhodes Scholar and the first Canadian Coach of the Year.

Peter Senge on the Necessary Revolution in Business

Jan 24, 2019

Imagine a world in which the excess energy from one business would be used to power another. A world in which environmentally sound products and processes would be more cost-effective than wasteful ones. A world in which corporations forming partnerships with environmental and social justice organizations to ensure better stewardship of the earth and development of societies all over the world. Now, stop imagining - that world is already emerging. As Peter Senge and his co-authors reveal in The Necessary Revolution, companies around the world are boldly leading the change from dead-end "business as usual" tactics to transformative strategies that are essential for creating a flourishing, sustainable world. Peter Senge is senior lecturer at MIT and the founding chair of the Society for Organizational Learning. He was named as one of the 24 people who had "the greatest influence on business strategy over the last 100 years" by the Journal of Business Strategy. Senge is an author or co-author of several bestselling books, including The Fifth Discipline, Schools That Learn, and Presence. BRYAN SMITH, coauthor with Senge of The Dance of Change and two other Fifth Discipline fieldbooks, is a member of the faculty at York University's Sustainable Enterprise Academy, and president of Broad Reach Innovations, Inc..

Phil Rosenzweig on the Halo Effect and How to Fight It

Jan 24, 2019

Phil Rosenzweig's new book The Halo Effect... and the Eight Other Business Delusions That Deceive Managers offers a sharp critique of current management thinking, exposing many of the errors and mistaken ideas that pervade the business world, and suggests a more accurate way to think about company performance. He is a professor at IMD, the International Institute for Management Development, in Lausanne, Switzerland, where he works with leading companies on questions of strategy and organization.

Piyanka Jain on How to Make the Right Decisions

Jan 24, 2019

It can be nerve-wracking to make decisions. How will you know if it's the right decision? Sometimes you can't know until it's already too late. Piyanka Jain, in her new book Behind Every Good Decision, co-written by Puneet Sharma and published by AMACOM, offers a framework to sort through all the data and make the most informed decision possible.

Quint Studer on Getting Results That Last

Jan 24, 2019

Quint Studer has built a thriving career on helping healthcare companies achieve maximum effectiveness and consistent bottom-line results. Now, in Results That Last, he brings his ideas to the rest of the business world. Studer teaches leaders in every industry how to apply his tactics and strategies to their own organizations to build a corporate culture that consistently reaches and exceeds its goals. Quint Studer is an acclaimed leadership and healthcare consultant and the founder of the Studer Group, an outcome firm that coaches some 300 hospitals and health systems on achieving operational excellence. He is also the author of the self-published hit Hardwiring Excellence, a book that has more than 200,000 copies currently in circulation.

Rachael Brown on Paying Employees to Quit

Jan 24, 2019

Founded in 1999, the online shoe retailer Zappos.com has been an astonishing success story, growing to nearly $1 billion in sales. Even more impressive than its sales numbers, however, are the numbers of customers who rave about Zappos customer service excellence. The company's success at customer service starts with its training program. In this interview, Zappos training manager Rachael Brown tells Edgewise how the company develops its stellar customer service - and why Zappos offers new employees $1,000 to quit.

Rafiq Dossani on India’s Rise to the Top of Global Business

Jan 24, 2019

Rafiq Dossani discusses India's growing role in the global economy in his new book India Arriving (AMACOM Books). India has the world's fourth largest economy, the largest youth population, and the current ranking of the second-most-preferred destination for foreign investment, yet its importance to the worldwide market seems to be swept under the rug. Dossani's book provides a deeper understanding of a country that promises to be the next major player in the world economy.

Ram Charan on The Attacker's Advantage

Jan 24, 2019

"If you don't do, somebody else will." There is no company that is too big to fail. There will be outside forces coming that will either be competitors or change the landscape of industry, it's only a matter of time. Ram Charan, author of The Attacker's Advantage, joins us to talk about how to get out ahead of competition and adapt to all changes.

Rasmus Hougaard & Jacqueline Carter on Leading Yourself and Others

Jan 24, 2019

Changing culture starts from the ground up. Rasmus Hougaard & Jacqueline Carter, authors of The Mind of a Leader, advise that any leader who wants to affect change should just start, today. First walk the walk in your own leadership style, then let that radiate out through your own team and onward through the rest of the organization.

Richard P. Finnegan on The Stay Interview

Jan 24, 2019

We've all encountered a performance review a few times in our life. So often that conversation is about things the employee needs to stop doing. Rarely do bosses and their employees discuss what the employee wants to do more of. That's where Richard Finnegan's Stay Interview concept comes in. Detailed in his new book, The Stay Interview, published by AMACOM, this kind of discussion increases transparency and therefore retention of the quality employees before they start heading out the door.

Richard Thaler on the "Architecture of Choice"

Jan 24, 2019

Our errors are what make us human, but until now, they have been largely ignored by those around us, whether they make a complex public policy or sell us a plain old bottle of wine. In a new book, Nudge, Economist Richard Thaler and legal scholar Cass Sunstein, invite us into an alternative world, one that takes our humanness as a given. They show that by knowing how people think, we can design choice environments that make it easier for them to choose what is best for themselves, their families, and their society. Richard H. Thaler is the Ralph and Dorothy Keller Distinguished Service Professor of Behavioral Science and Economics and the director of the Center for Decision Research at the University of Chicago's Graduate School of Business.

Rick Rickertsen on Selling Your Business Your Way

Jan 24, 2019

In his new book Sell Your Business Your Way: Getting Out, Getting Rich, and Getting On With Your Life (AMACOM Books), Rick Rickertsen walks readers through the entire process of selling, from valuation and preparing the business for sale to finding a buyer and assembling and closing the deal. He also addresses some often overlooked concerns, including managing the emotional issues that can undermine business and financial decisions. Rickertsen is the Managing Partner of Pine Creek Partners, a $50 million private equity fund with the goal of backing entrepreneurial executives in management buyout transactions. In this week's You've Been Spotted segment, Kevin Lee interviews participants from AMA's course "Fundamentals of Financial Analysis."  Listen to these participants share practices, tips and guidelines they've learned from the course. 

Robert Bloom on Finding Your Company’s Inside Advantage

Jan 24, 2019

Every enterprise has at least one strategic asset-one existing strength-that can form the foundation for future growth. Finding this hidden potential and becoming well known for it will grow the business. Robert H. Bloom calls this the Inside Advantage, which happens to be the title of his new book. As US Chairman and CEO of Publicis Worldwide, the centerpiece of the $4.6 billion global marketing services company, Bloom helped craft and implement the growth strategies of some of the world's largest companies and brands. At Publicis, Bloom managed over 1000 employees, 12 US offices, and a roster of clients including BMW, L'Oreal, Nestle, TGI Friday's, Whirlpool, Zales Jewelers, and T-Mobile. He directed the launch of numerous brands that have become household names such as Southwest Airlines, Nestle Juicy-Juice, T-Mobile US, Novartis' Theraflu and Triaminic.

Robert Lopes on Growing a Business in the Right Direction

Jan 24, 2019

The first 12 months of a CEO's tenure provides insights into the effectiveness of his or her leadership style, his or her priorities, and ”most important” his or her fit in the organization. In January 2006, Robert Lopes joined Veritude, a division of Devonshire Investors, the private equity arm of Fidelity Investments, as its president and chief executive officer, bringing his significant professional experience in HR services and proven ability to successfully build a business. Lopes shares insights into his strategy, execution and lessons learned from the critical first months of his tenure. In addition to creating a three to five year plan help guide his employees, Lopes believes in the importance of establishing a culture that includes clearly defined goals and positive support to achieve business success.Veritude was founded in 1986 as the internal provider for Fidelity's North American staffing needs. Today, it offers a full suite of services including recruitment process outsourcing, staffing, managed services, and consulting. To quote its mission statement, "It partners with clients to develop and deliver talent management solutions that adapt to changing business and demographic realities and drive competitive advantage." Prior to Veritude, Lopes was a key member of the team that created ExcellerateHRO, a jointly owned business of EDS and Towers Perrin. When the new company was launched, Lopes assumed the pivotal role of vice president, Global Client Management. He brought together two cultures and more than 400 clients in five geographic regions to ensure a positive transition to the new company.

Roberta Matuson on Becoming a Magnetic Leader

Jan 24, 2019

We talk a lot about great leaders but a leader needs a team working with them. Roberta Matuson has written a new book called The Magnetic Leader and she joins us to talk about her definition of magnetism as well as how to attract, hire, and retain top talent.

Rodd Wagner on defeating workplace disengagement

Jan 24, 2019

Rodd Wagner is the coauthor of 12: The Elements of Great Managing, the long-awaited sequel to the 1999 runaway bestseller First, Break All the Rules. Grounded in Gallup's 10 million employee and manager interviews spanning 114 countries, 12 follows great managers as they harness employee engagement to turn around a failing call center, save a struggling hotel, improve patient care in a hospital, maintain production through power outages, and successfully face a host of other challenges in settings around the world.

In this week's you've been spotted segment, Kevin Lee interviews participants of the "Management Skills For New Supervisors" seminar. Listen to these managers share their experiences in dealing with workplace disengagement.

Ron Hira on the Inside Story of Outsourcing America

Jan 24, 2019

One of the hottest, most controversial topics in the news is the outsourcing of American jobs to other countries. Outsourced jobs are extending well beyond the manufacturing sector to include white-collar professionals, particularly in information technology, financial services, and customer service. In his new book Outsourcing America, Ron Hira reveals just how much outsourcing is taking place, what its impact is and will be, and what can be done about the loss of jobs. Ron Hira, Ph.D., PE, is a recognized expert on outsourcing, and the only person to testify twice before Congress on its implications. He has appeared on national television and radio, and has been widely quoted in the New York Times, Time, Newsweek, The Wall Street Journal, Financial Times, Times of London and other publications.

Rosanne Thomas on Manners for the Modern Age

Jan 24, 2019

In the world of social media we need a modern Emily Post more than ever. Enter Rosanne Thomas with her book Excuse Me on how to navigate the business world with poise and tact. She joins us today with some of her tips from her new book, published by AMACOM, and make sure to sign up for her webcast with even more ideas on manners in the 21st century. Register here!

Suzanne Bates on the Science of Executive Presence

Jan 24, 2019

Suzanne Bates, author of All the Leader You Can Be, is here to give us a definition of "executive presence." It's something we all want but it's hard to quantify. Suzanne is here with data to back up just what we should be working on to be the best leader we can be.

Sydney Finkelstein on Super Bosses

Jan 24, 2019

How does Sydney Finelstein, author of Superbosses, define a leader? To him, a leader is someone who creates other leaders. When everyone around you is growing their leadership skills, you can't help but get better yourself. Listen for more tips on leadership and more examples of successful superbosses.

Terrence Gargiulo on Taming Difficult People

Jan 24, 2019

From Tibet to Mexico to the Balkans, every culture has its own cherished folktales. While originally made up to reinforce morals and good behavior, these stories aren't just for kids. Many fables featuring whimsical creatures and talking animals have much to teach grownups about handling slackers, connivers, ogres, and other dreaded real-life figures in our workplace. In the Land of Difficult People: 24 Timeless Tales Reveal How to Tame the Beasts at Work (AMACOM 2008) by Terrence L. Gargiulo and Gini Graham Scott, Ph.D. presents 24 fables taken from around the world, each exemplifying the best methods to use when dealing with the different kinds of difficult people at work. Gathered from around the world -China, Japan, Persia, Morocco, Denmark, Germany, France, Russia, and other countries, as well as Celtic and Native American traditions- these treasured yarns offer valuable lessons for anyone with interpersonal troubles on the job. After each tale, Gargiulo and Scott provide a brief analysis, drawing parallels between the fable's animals and real world behavior that wreaks havoc on organizations. They wrap up with a list of practical tips and proven tactics for dealing with domineering supervisors, destructive colleagues, and overly independent employees. The book introduces eight common types of personalities who make work a nightmare. Terrence L. Gargiulo, President of MakingStories.net, is a speaker and consultant on the role of narrative in organizations, whose clients include Coca-Cola, GM, the Harvard Business School, and the US Coast Guard. He is also the author of On Cloud Nine: Weathering the Challenge of Many Generations in the Workplace. He lives in Monterey, California. Gini Graham Scott, Ph.D., is the founder and director of Changemakers. She has written numerous books, including A Survival Guide for Working with Humans and A Survival Guide to Managing Employees from Hell. She makes her home in Oakland and Santa Monica, California.

Tim Sanders on Dealstorming

Jan 24, 2019

These days if you want to make a sale it's not just one person you have to convince anymore. Purchasing power is spread throughout the organization and there's plenty of people to consult. It's harder than ever. Tim Sanders joins us to talk about his book Dealstorming and how to be successful at sales in the ever changing world of work.

Tim Sanders on How to Save the World From Your Office

Jan 24, 2019

Every one of us, regardless of title or position, can inspire our companies to change the way they do business, helping them to become a positive force for enriching people, communities, and the environment. When this happens, not only do we help save the world, we help save our companies from becoming irrelevant. Companies that don't participate in this revolution risk becoming obsolete. In Saving the World at Work, Tim Sanders offers concrete suggestions on how all of us can help our companies join the Responsibility Revolution. Drawing on extensive interviews with hundreds of employees and CEOs, and illuminated by countless stories of people who are making a difference in the workplace and in the world, Sanders offers practical advice every individual and company can use to make the world a better place--now and in the future. Tim Sanders is the author of Love Is the Killer App and a top speaker on the lecture circuit. He was the chief solutions officer at Yahoo!Inc. from 2001to 2005, where he worked on next-generation business strategies. He has been featured in Time and USA TODAY, and has appeared on Today, CNN, Fox and Friends, Tucker Carlson, and on national radio.

Tom Yorton on Improv Skills at Work

Jan 24, 2019

Do you wish you could run a meeting like Tina Fey? Or work a room like Stephen Colbert? It's not just about humor in the workplace (although that too, is vital) but how to work as a truly collaborative team and learning to stop fearing failure. The new book Yes, And: How Improvisation Reverses "No, But" Thinking and Improves Creativity and Collaboration--Lessons from The Second City, coauthored by Tom Yorton and Kelly Leonard, incorporates lessons from the legendary improvisational theater troupe into business best practices.

Tony Beshara on How to Ace Your Next Interview

Jan 24, 2019

At some point, most people have been caught off guard by tough interview questions. In Acing the Interview: How to Ask and Answer the Questions That Will Get You the Job, the employment expert Dr. Phil called "the best of the best" gives job seekers candid advice for answering even the most unexpected questions.

For additional training on this topic, consider these AMA seminars:
Projecting a Positive Professional Image
Recruiting, Interviewing and Selecting Employees

To learn more, read these AMACOM Books:
Acing the Interview: How to Ask and Answer the Questions That Will Get You the Job by Tony Beshara
Winning the Interview Game by Alan H. Nierenberg
High-Impact Interview Questions by Victoria A. Hoevemeyer

Vijay Govindarajan on the Three Box Solution

Jan 24, 2019

If you want to succeed in the future you have to put down roots now. Vijay Govindarajan, author of  The Three Box Solution, joins us to talk about the three key steps you need to take to succeed and which of those steps you're probably overlooking.

Whitney Johnson on Disruptive Innovation

Jan 24, 2019

If you want to learn about disruption, look to Lady Gaga. She was a record-breaking pop-star who decided to make a jazz album with Tony Bennett, completely counter to what anyone thought her audience would like. Whitney Johnson, author of the new book Build an A-Team, joins us to talk about successful disruption and how it can apply to your work.

William F Baker on Art as a Business

Jan 24, 2019

Artists usually chose their profession for the love of the craft but if they don't have some business skills they're going to get left behind. William F. Baker, co-author of The World's Your Stage, published by AMACOM, has tips on how to brand yourself, how to assess your competition, and act like an entrepreneur.

William Rothwell on Leveraging a Seasoned Talent Pool

Jan 24, 2019

While many employers have traditionally viewed their younger employees as their most precious assets, the truth is that their more seasoned workers are often their most valuable. In his new book, Working Longer (AMACOM), William J Rothwell gives recruiters, managers, and trainers the tools they need to nurture and empower these vital employees. The book includes: creative strategies for recruiting retirees and developing a senior friendly workplace; career and performance management techniques for effectively motivating and engaging older workers; and  instructional design facilitation methods that will enable older workers to upgrade their skills.

Winners of the 2007 Alliance Awards on Strategic Alliance Excellence

Jan 24, 2019

Strategic alliances and partnerships play a crucial role in growing businesses in today's marketplace. But for every success story, there are numerous perils and pitfalls waiting to cause alliances to fail; so what are the secrets to strategic alliance success? The Association for Strategic Alliance Professionals awarded a handful of companies its annual Alliance Awards for demonstrating excellence in strategic alliances. In this podcast we interview several strategic alliance executives from these companies to share insights behind their outstanding success. Norma Watenpaugh, Vice Chairman of ASAP, introduces her organization and its commitment to strategic alliance excellence. Danita Brewer, Senior Manager of Alliance Effectiveness at Procter and Gamble Pharmaceuticals. P&G Pharmaceuticals has driven double-digit sales growth for five consecutive years based on its portfolio of 28 different alliances. John Buckingham, Senior Vice President of Alliance Management with Endo Pharmaceuticals. Endo has built its success in pharmaceutical development and marketing by aggressively seeking effective alliance management practices at all points along the value chain, and as a result they have really changed the landscape of the pharma industry. Henk De Graauw, director of alliances at KLM Airlines, which started the first airline joint venture with Northwest over a decade ago, and has since grown into the Sky Team Alliance, which commands a 31% share of the North Atlantic market. Michael Weller, Programme Director, British Telecom/Hewlett Packard Alliance. BTs alliance with HP has created significant value for both parent companies, generating approximately $1 billion in less than three years.

David Rock on How to Maximize Your Brain at Work

Jan 24, 2019

In Your Brain at Work, David Rock takes readers inside the heads—literally—of a modern two-career couple as they mentally process their workday to reveal how we can better organize, prioritize, remember, and process our daily lives. Rock, the author of Quiet Leadership and Personal Best, shows how it’s possible for this couple, and thus the reader, not only to survive in today’s overwhelming work environment but succeed in it—and still feel energized and accomplished at the end of the day.

Bill George on Seven Lessons for Leading in a Crisis

Jan 24, 2019

Bill George’s reputation as a leadership guru has expanded exponentially with each of his best-selling books on the subject. One of the top professors on leadership at Harvard Business School, he turns his attention now to the timely topic of leading in a high-pressure, economically challenged business climate with 7 Lessons for Leading in Crisis. Here we have Bill George’s very personal perspective sharing his thoughts and reflections based on his experiences and those of executives he knows well.

Cass Wheeler on How to Achieve Purpose Beyond Profit

Jan 24, 2019

We all know that the definition for success in the corporate world is fairly straightforward. To be considered great, companies first need to turn a profit. For organizations in the social sector, however, the challenge is much bigger. To be truly effective, they must stay relevant and, above all, stay true to their mission. For the past thirty-five years, Cass Wheeler has ensured that the American Heart Association has fulfilled its calling to save lives and educate the public about heart disease by adopting some of the same strategies used in the for-profit sector.

In You’ve Gotta Have Heart, he shows people at all levels of a nonprofit how to make sure their hard work really pays off. Using examples of some of the American Heart Association and others, Wheeler reveals the leadership skills that will help employees, volunteers, and board members excel at their jobs, become good role models, and build a more visionary, creative, and disciplined nonprofit organization.

John Baldoni on How to Lead by Example

Jan 24, 2019

Taking over the top job, whether it’s the CEO of a company or the manager of a department, is never easy. When done the right way, it results in inspired leadership; when done the wrong way, it can lead to disaster. To be effective, the people in charge must give their team a reason to believe in their talents and their ability to get people to work together.

In Lead by Example, recognized leadership guru John Baldoni reveals the traits and abilities leaders need to know to inspire others to follow them.

William Schiemann on Reinventing Talent Management

Jan 24, 2019

Over the past 10 or so years talent management has become something of an HR hurrah term. The extent to which all the hubbub has led to tangible results is quite another issue. Dr. William Schiemann’s Reinventing Talent Management: How to Maximize Performance in the New Marketplace aims to put a tight process and discipline of measurement behind the annual report cliché that “Our people are our most important asset.” At the heart of Dr. Schiemann’s thesis is a provocative new talent management model he terms People Equity.

Jason Jennings on How New Leaders Can Hit the Ground Running

Jan 24, 2019

You have to hit the ground running— diagnose the situation, pull together a strong team, decide on a strategy, and inspire everyone to execute it.

Jason Jennings and his research team searched for the new CEOs who had pulled off the most impressive transformations of this decade. He interviewed ten who, on average, had doubled revenues, doubled profit margins, and more than tripled earnings per share, at companies such as Staples, Goodrich, Humana, and J. M. Smucker.

Jennings’ new book, Hit the Ground Running, lists ten new “golden rules” that can help leaders balance the short term and the long term, and the competing needs of shareholders, employees, customers, and the community.

J. Byrne Murphy on the Best Ways to Do Business Overseas

Jan 24, 2019

When J. Byrne Murphy moved to France in the early 1990s to launch the European division of MacArthur Glen, a company that operates high fashion outlet malls, he was sure the venture would be a slam dunk. The MacArthur Glen concept had been a tremendous success in America, and the fashion loving European market seemed like a natural fit. But, as he describes in his new book, Le Deal: How a Young American, in Business, in Love, and in Over His Head, Kick-Started a Multibillion Dollar Industry in Europe, what Murphy didn’t realize was that he was walking into a political, perfect storm of anti American sentiment and protectionist policies that included the Prime Minister of France declaring a moratorium on all new retail development across the country.

John Hoover and Paul Gorrell on Connecting Coaching to the Organization

Jan 24, 2019

Coaching has traditionally focused entirely on the individual…sometimes even at the expense of improving measurable business results for the company. The Coaching Connection (AMACOM) by John Hoover and Paul J. Gorrell shows managers how they can use contextual coaching to simultaneously promote both individual and organizational growth. The book helps readers align what individual contributors do best with what organizations need most, ensuring everyone involved their highest probability for success.

 

Bill George on Finding Your True North

Jan 24, 2019

As former President and CEO of Medtronic, now a professor at Harvard, Bill George has paved his own path to success. If you ask him what's his secret, he'll tell you its about "finding your True North" which also happens to be the title of his new book. A companion guide to his best seller True North, Finding Your True North offers methods for personal reflection and includes targeted exercises that help leaders hone in on the purpose of their leadership and the development of their authentic leadership skills. Bill George is Professor of Management Practice at Harvard Business School, where he is teaching leadership and leadership development along with several executive education programs. His previous two books, True North: Discover Your Authentic Leadership and Authentic Leadership: Rediscovering the Secrets to Creating Lasting Value, were also best-sellers.

Paul Teutul, Sr. on Doing Business the Orange County Choppers Way

Jan 24, 2019

If you think cruising down the highway on a custom chopper is the ultimate thrill ride, try running your own business. The same outlaw spirit that drives some people to strap on a helmet and hit the road drives other people to risk it all and build a business from the ground up. Bikers and entrepreneurs share at least one trait. They do it their way without compromise. That’s the opening liner note of a book entitled The Ride Of A Lifetime, written by Paul Teutul Sr.

Peter Firestein on Building Success Through Reputation

Jan 24, 2019

Public opinion in the wake of the financial meltdown has revealed the public’s abiding mistrust of corporations and the executives who run them. Scrutiny from the Internet and 24-hour cable TV offers companies no place to hide; so they must proactively seek the confidence of their shareholders and the public. In today’s economy, reputation is a prime factor in a corporation’s bottom line.

Peter Firestein presents Seven Strategies of Reputation Leadership in his book Crisis of Character, offering a fail-proof way for executives to immunize themselves and their companies against the breakdowns that can happen to even the most prominent organizations. Using real-life examples (from Merck and Citigroup to Hewlett-Packard and Coca-Cola), Crisis of Character presents concrete ways executives can shape the internal corporate culture to support their business interests.

 

David Rhodes on Management During Recession

Jan 24, 2019

Historically, it is innovation that creates the next wave of growth in the economy during a downturn. Instead of trying the same thing over again, David Rhodes, suggests innovation in green technology, health care, and defense. Companies who embrace the changing economic climate are the ones primed to come out on top of a problematic economy.

Dan Coughlin on Management Success Lessons from Top Auto Racing Teams

Jan 24, 2019

The Management 500 (AMACOM Books) provides practical management lessons drawn from the history of professional auto racing. With insights and stories from some of the most successful people in Formula 1, IndyCar Series, and NASCAR over the past 60 years including Lee White, President of Toyota Racing Development and Ed Laukes, head of Toyota Motorsports, consultant Dan Coughlin shows busy managers how they can rev up their skills in areas like leadership, teamwork, strategy, branding, problem-solving, change management and innovation, and get their company running in high gear.

Emily Nagle Green on Technology Anywhere

Jan 24, 2019

From the Walkman to the iPod, humans are a mobile species and now with smart phones and wireless networks, we’re more on-the-go and in touch than ever. Now companies have to be ready for this mobile clientele anywhere, any time. Emily Nagle Green, in her new book Anywhere: How Global Connectivity Is Revolutionizing the Way We Do Business, gives examples of how companies can adapt to these changes and keep up with their customers, anywhere.

Jody Heymann on Keeping Every Employee Motivated and Profitable

Jan 24, 2019

Jody Heymann wants companies to invest in workers at the bottom of the ladder. These employees, the ones running the factory assembly lines or the retail cash registers, are the ones closest to the products and the customers and the employees who really know what is going on with the company. Smart managers know that if there is a problem that needs to be solved, they go to these employees first. In her book Profit at the Bottom of the Ladder, Heymann shows that the most successful companies are the ones who have invested in training and benefits for all of their employees, keeping them happy, productive, and turning a profit.

Tom Rath on What Makes Us Happy at Work (and at Home)

Jan 24, 2019

In his new book Wellbeing, Tom Rath, with his writing partner Jim Harter, has identified five elements that contribute to a happy and well-adjusted life. These elements are universal to all countries and cultures. He details these five elements, how they affect us, and how we can makes changes in our lives, both in the workplace and in our personal lives, to be more fulfilled, more productive, and happier.

Charlene Li on the Importance of Social Media to Promote Openness

Jan 24, 2019


Facebook isn’t just for college students anymore. Businesses are quickly learning that a social media presence, on Facebook, on Twitter, or on their blogs, can be vastly important to the company. In her new book Open Leadership, Charlene Li talks about how to use these new sites to generate interest in the company, both for the customers and for the employees, giving them a sense of purpose and enthusiasm.

John Putzier and Dave Baker on Making HR an Integral Part of the Company

Jan 24, 2019

Gone are the days of HR only being good for the company picnic. John Putzier and Dave Baker, authors of the new book The Everything HR Kit, want Human Resources to start inspiring their employees on day one and then never stop. Though HR often has to take a legal stance and say no sometimes, they can also act as a creative team and come up with innovative solutions themselves.

Robert Sutton on How to Be a Good Boss and Avoid Being a Bad Boss

Jan 24, 2019

How can you tell if you’re one of those bad bosses? It’s hard to self-evaluate. According to a Zogby study, 35% of workers reported having a boss who bullied them but only 0.5% of bosses said they ever bullied anyone. Obviously, there is a disconnect somewhere. Robert Sutton, in his new book Good Boss, Bad Boss, gives some tips on how to look inward and figure out if you’re a good boss or a bad boss.

Jon Katzenbach and Zia Khan on the Right Balance of Formal and Informal Organizations

Jan 24, 2019

Jon Katzenback and Zia Khan don’t want you to have fun at work. More specifically, they don’t want you to try to have fun; often that leads to trying too hard, strained attempts at socializing, and not a lot of work getting done. The work day flies by even faster when ideas are flying in meetings, instead of icebreakers. Katzenbach and Khan say, leave the socializing and fun to the informal networks in an organization, and they will come to it naturally.

Sander Flaum on Turning Big Ideas into Big Profits

Jan 24, 2019

No one needed an iPhone; we all wanted one. Steve Jobs didn’t bother doing any market research, it would have been useless. Once he had a great idea he ran with it, got it turned around quickly, and now iPhones are ubiquitous. According to Sander Flaum, author of the new book Big Shoes: How Successful Leaders Grow into New Roles, that’s what all successful CEOs do. If a CEO wants to stick around, he or she not only will cultivate ideas but will make sure something gets done.

Chris Carey on Fostering Your Specific Workplace Culture

Jan 24, 2019

Improving workplace culture isn’t just about making it more fun. All the holiday parties and cool decorations mean nothing when the workers aren’t engaged. Chris Carey points out that not all companies are built the same, and therefore, no two cultures will be the same. Just look at the military culture: even though the style is dictatorial to the extreme, it is still effective. Carey isn’t suggesting we all hire drill sergeants for managers. Instead, the managers need to figure out what matters to their employees and foster a culture that encourages that, whether it be exciting innovation or excellent customer service.

Dave Gray on How Games at Work Inspire Creativity

Jan 24, 2019

According to Dave Gray in his new book, Gamestorming, playing with office supplies is not a waste of time. Whipping out a stack of post-its in a meeting and jotting down notes or sketching ideas is actually helpful; otherwise all those ideas have to stay inside your head, getting lost and confused. Writing out ideas, moving them around like pieces in a game, and collaborating with others makes for faster meetings and more creativity. Every company needs those creative ideas to reach the top even just stay there.

Bill Jensen on How to Hack Your Workplace

Jan 24, 2019

Companies are not designed to help us get our work done. Often there’s an easier way of doing our work but approval processes are slow and ideas stagnate. It’s only a select group of people, “hackers” as Bill Jensen calls them, who rise up and force change with their own ideas and without permission. If used benevolently, the "work arounds" will become companywide and increase the workers’ happiness and their free time.

John Baldoni on Leadership Through the Tough Times

Jan 24, 2019

To John Baldoni, leadership doesn’t change just because of a bad economy. When leadership is about people, whether it be training the next generation of leaders or just stopping to chat with other employees, that stays the same even during a recession. It is a leader’s job to inspire confidence in their people so that they will be resilient during the hard times and remain in the company when things get better.

John Kotter on How to Get the People in Your Life to Buy In to Your Ideas

Jan 24, 2019

You’ve got a great idea and you’ve made it all the way to that important meeting. Now you’ve just got to get everyone else to agree with you. John Kotter’s new book Buy In is for you. He’s distilled the most common objections to ideas and written right responses to push back and not take “no” (or “not now” or “maybe tomorrow”) for an answer.

Peter Gloor on How to be a Cool Farmer

Jan 24, 2019

We all want to be cool, even if everyone has a different definition of what that is. Great leaders step back and listen to their employees and their customers to find out what is cool for them. In his newest book, Coolfarming, Peter Gloor talks about how to succeed by truly listening to the community and using that audience to decide what is cool.

Michelle Johnson on Creating a Culture of Acceptance in the Workplace

Jan 24, 2019

If you have to ask if a certain behavior is discriminatory, chances are, there’s already a problem. For every discrimination lawsuit, there were many more instances where discrimination occurred and was not reported. Workplace discrimination is about more than the standard list of minorities that are protected by law. Everyone who comes in to work has a different worldview. Moreover, if a person has a different way of working from the person in the next cubicle, that should be respected. In her new book, The Diversity Code, Michelle Johnson lets us know that it’s more than following a simple set of rules, each company needs to create a culture of acceptance.

Adrian Ott on Customers Who Are Always Connected

Jan 24, 2019

Renting a movie can be fun, until the next day when you have to find time to return it to the store. Netflix saw that, and revolutionized the movie rental industry with easy delivery and no late fees. Blockbuster, late to the movies on demand game, recently filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy. When time is our most precious resource, companies who value that and cater to the customer’s needs are the ones who rise to and stay on top. In her new book The 24 Hour Customer, Adrian Ott suggests that time is the most important competitive factor in today’s economy.

Mike Schwager on Projecting Your Best Professional Image

Jan 24, 2019

The most important part of an interview happens before the microphones are even turned on or the cameras start rolling. Preparation is key to any successful interview, says our guest, Mike Schwager. Remember to think about the talking points you want to bring up, be prepared to defend your stance without being defensive, and most of all, relax.

Stan Slap on Engaging Emotional Commitment in the Workforce

Jan 24, 2019

Stan Slap asked thousands of managers what were their most important personal values and the top answers were “family” and “integrity.” When he asked the same managers which values they were most pressured to compromise, the top answers were “family” and “integrity.” It’s not that work is simply keeping us away from home and forcing us to lie, it’s that the majority of the workforce feels that it cannot truly be comfortable in the workplace. In his new book, Bury My Heart at Conference Room B, Slap discusses ways to tap into these unmet needs and create true emotional engagement in employees.

Andrew Bennett on Well-Informed Shoppers Changing Consumer Culture

Jan 24, 2019

The way we shop has shifted dramatically, leading to an increase in the number of store-label brands being purchased to 20%. What’s surprising is that this is not just because of a change in the economy; in fact, most people buy the off-label brands because they’re really not that different from the big names. In his new book Consumed, Andrew Bennett deals with the many different ways consumer culture has changed to fit the new smart shoppers.

Stefan Swanepoel on Leveraging Your Animal Instincts

Jan 24, 2019

Here's a serious question: Are you an elephant or a crocodile? According to author and businessman Stefan Swanepoel, the answer could determine your career path and level of success. Stefan’s latest book Surviving Your Serengeti: 7 Skills to Master Business & Life is a New York Times best-seller that uses animals and their characteristics as metaphors for professionals and their skills and competencies. Listen to identify and unleash your inner beast.

Dan Pink on the Modus Operandi of Motivation

Jan 24, 2019

Work + produce = reward. This is thought to be the algorithm that inspires efficiency across the workforce.

Best-selling author Dan Pink discusses his findings, based on over 40 years of research that the stimulus for success isn’t just the almighty dollar but the presence of autonomy, mastery, and purpose in an employees work life. Pink shares tactics to tap into and harness one’s personal rhythm of productivity, to empower peak performance and to make lasting contributions to within an organization. 



 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Jennifer Kahnweiler on the Introvert Advantage

Jan 24, 2019

According to Jennifer Kahnweiler, author of Introverted Leader: Building on Your Quiet Strength, introversion is a trait shared by society’s most distinguished leaders: Bill Gates, Warren Buffet, and President Obama. In this episode of Edgewise, she provides tips on how to harness attributes commonly associated with introversion, such as calm temperament, depth of focus, and thoughtful communication to lead effectively.  Kahnweiler also delves into the introvert/extrovert dynamic across corporate hierarchy, how introverts are embracing social media to build their brands, and the surprising truth about introverts and corporate power.

 

David Livermore on the Cultural Intelligence Difference

Jan 24, 2019

David Livermore, author of The Cultural Intelligence Difference (AMACOM 2011), defines Cultural Intelligence Quotient (CQ) as one’s ability to function effectively across national, ethnic, and organizational cultures. From a misinterpreted gesture, to an e-mail in lieu of a phone call, there are implicit actions, rules, and guidelines that differ from countries or even corporations, that can make a profound professional impression. Knowledge of these nuances isn’t innate, regardless of skill-level, IQ, or EQ. But CQ can be learned. Livermore outlines the four areas of CQ and why your proficiency in them can be the defining factor in your career progress.

Susan Shearouse on the Upside of Conflict

Jan 24, 2019

Whether personal or professional, conflict is inevitable. In her book  Conflict 101: A Manager's Guide to Resolving Problems So Everyone Can Get Back to Work" (AMACOM) Susan Shearouse, with 20 years of experience in mitigating disagreements as a conflict resolution strategist, discusses the importance of trust, how assumptions lead to false perceptions, and using the “Satisfaction Triangle” as a conflict arbitration tool.

Susan Shearouse has provided facilitation, mediation, technical assistance, training in conflict resolution processes, group decision-making processes, managing change, sexual harassment awareness and organizational effectiveness to organizations and individuals since 1990.  She is an adjunct staff member for the American Arbitration Association, McNamara and Associates, Inc., and an associate of Resolution Dynamics, Inc. In addition, she has served as Alternative Dispute Resolution (ADR) Specialist for the Federal Mediation and Conciliation Services (FMCS) and as adjunct faculty in Georgetown University’s MBA program. she earned a Master of Science in Conflict Resolution from George Mason University in 1988 and servedas  Executive Director of the National Conference on Peacemaking and Conflict Resolution (NCPCR). She is on the Advisory Board of the Institute for Conflict Analysis and Resolution at George Mason University.

Roger Courville on Optimizing Your Online Presentations

Jan 24, 2019

Standing out in the world of Webinars can be challenging. Content abounds and attention spans are ever-fleeting. Online presentation guru, Roger Courville, discusses how to effectively leverage nuances of the virtual space to convey your message and win audiences. From graphic design to communication models and culture, Courville highlights the key elements to creating and delivering stimulating online programs.

Courville is author of The Virtual Presenter’s Handbook, contributing author to Business Expert Guide to Small Business Success, and an internationally sought-after speaker on using virtual eye contact and body language in Webinars. He is Principal at 1080 Group, a training and coaching firm helping executives design and deliver interactive Webinar presentations and programs.  The 1080 Group team has a collective experience that includes hundreds of clients, thousands of Web seminars, and more than a million Web seminar attendees.

James Morgan on Strategic Execution and Process

Jan 24, 2019

Strategy execution is the crux of success in business. So why do less than half of companies polled in a recent Booz Allen survey feel they are meeting their targets? Dr. James Morgan shares insight from his 30 years of experience of sharpening strategic visions and implementing methods to see them through. He details the pitfalls and the core tenets of strategic planning and execution. Listen, take notes, and start winning!

Jane Stevenson on Driving Innovation

Jan 24, 2019

Innovation—it’s more than a ubiquitous term for the shiny, new, and different. Jane Stevenson, coauthor of Breaking Away:  How Great Leaders Create Innovation That Drives Sustainable Growth—and Why Others Fail, mines the minds of high profile executives and shares the gems that spark success. She defines four categories of innovation and the characteristics of leaders within them. She also details how companies like Google and GE use metrics and algorithms to forecast trends, and how CEOS can embrace the ideas of risk and failure along the trajectory to success.

Bill Holland on Cracking the New Job Market

Jan 24, 2019

What do Food network star Paula Dean and waste management mogul Sidney Torres have in common? They bred their super successful brands out of hardship,  explains career expert Bill Holland in this episode of Edgewise. Holland shares strategies from his new book, Cracking the New Job Market: The Seven Rules for Getting Hired in Any Economy (AMACOM), and lays out how to represent yourself as a professional brand that clearly defines your value as congruent with what employers are recruiting for.

Robert Bloom on Winning Customer Preference

Jan 24, 2019

It’s 3:00 a.m. Do you know what your customer wants? According to Robert Bloom, author of The New Experts: Win Today’s Newly Empowered Customers at Their Four Decisive Moments, your customer is one second of smartphone research and a twitter review away from being on to the next brand. Bloom explains why anticipating the “3:00 a.m. nightmare” and nailing several make or break, now or never moments throughout the customer experience is the key to making your brand their preference.

Al Pittampalli on the Modern Meeting

Jan 24, 2019

Meetings are a staple of our work lives that can be an inefficient drain of time, resources and creativity. Al Pittampalli is the author of Read This Before Our Next Meeting, which outlines a fresh methodology to the meeting structure. The “modern meeting” encourages preparedness, speed, and results. Listen and discover how to make meetings fueled by action instead of delaying what needs to get done.

Susan Reed on the Power of Corporate Diversity

Jan 24, 2019

In the age of increasing globalization, corporate diversity in America remains relevant. Studies have shown that companies with greater diversity at the executive level outperform their competitors. In this episode of Edgewise, Susan Reed, author of The Diversity Index, explains ways employers are leveraging diversity by empowering their employees to create new products and explore untapped markets as well as how to broaden their spectrum of emerging leaders.

Ray Schwemmer and Rick Havrilla on Fostering a Collaborative Environment

Jan 24, 2019

In an age of hacking and leaking, managers have a lot to consider when it comes to collaboration technology. Ray Schwemmer and Rick Havrilla are coauthors of Dynamic Collaboration: How to Share Information, Solve Problems, and Increase Productivity Without Compromising Security, a new book that details how corporations can seamlessly and securely integrate tools that encourage employees to work together. Listen and discover how to enhance communication and create an efficient flow of information.

Lindsay Hutter on Employing and Empowering Millenials

Jan 24, 2019

In this episode of Edgewise, Lindsay Hutter discusses the dynamics of working with Millenials, the generation born between 1980 and 2001. Although they possess an invaluable affinity for technology, Hutter explains why it is also important for Gen Y to disconnect from social media and engage in mutually beneficial communication with their older co-workers. Listen and learn how to tap into the nuances of Gen Y and facilitate cross-generational collaboration.

Rajeev Pehsawaria on the Three Pillars of Sustainable Success

Jan 24, 2019

According to Rajeev Peshawaria, author of “Too Many Bosses, Too Few Leaders”, good leaders realize that their employees feed off of the energy they project. In this episode of Edgewise, Peshawaria outlines how leaders can realize goals by harnessing their energy and the energy of those around them. Then they can concentrate this valuable resource towards a clear vision. He also shares what he calls “The Three Pillars of Sustainable Success,” a guide to help leaders configure the strategy, structure, and culture of their enterprise.

Christopher Frank and Paul Magnone on Overcoming Information Overload

Jan 24, 2019

In this age of excess information, research paralysis often impedes business leaders in decision making. Christopher Frank and Paul Magnone, authors of the new book, Drinking from the Fire Hose: Making Smarter Decisions Without Drowning in Information, explain the power of asking key questions to sift through the overwhelming amount of data available. In this episode of Edgewise, Frank and Magnone share their Seven Fire Hose Questions to help everyone from CEOs to marketers siphon through this wealth of knowledge to make wiser business decisions.

Christine Eberle on Social Media and Corporate Culture

Jan 24, 2019

Although corporations recognize social media as a powerful tool for talent recruitment, customer engagement and sharing information, many organizations find their social media initiatives fail. According to Christine Eberle, contributor to The Social Media Management Handbook, this is often due to executive resistance or lack of collaboration across a multigenerational workforce. In this episode of Edgewise, Christine explains how companies can overcome these hurdles and leverage social media to facilitate conversations across silos, creating an inspired, engaged and aligned corporate culture. 

Emily King on Recruiting and Keeping Veterans

Jan 24, 2019

It can seem like there are a number of risks involved in hiring veterans into a more conventional workforce: the culture is completely different and their highly specialized skill-set doesn't seem to apply. Emily King, author of Field Tested: Recruiting, Managing, and Retaining Veterans, wants recruiters and HR professionals not to take military résumés so literally. Driving a tank may seem irrelevant to an office culture, but the skills, knowledge, and training that went in to learning how to use a very complicated and expensive piece of machinery can be extremely beneficial in any job.

Robert Kaplan’s Roadmap to Effective Leadership

Jan 24, 2019

In this edition of Edgewise Robert Kaplan, author of What to Ask the Person in the Mirror: Critical Questions for Becoming a More Effective Leader and Reaching Your Potential, describes the importance of self-management in creating a superb work culture. He explains the role of giving and taking honest feedback and which questions you need to ask yourself and which to ask colleagues across all levels of management. Tune in and also learn tips from Kaplan's leadership roadmap, including determining when it is ok to say no and how to take ownership of your leadership pipeline.

Anders Dahlvig on IKEA’s Global Social Ambition

Jan 24, 2019

In this edition of Edgewise Anders Dahlvig chronicles his rise from store manager to president CEO of IKEA. He discusses his book, The IKEA Edge: Building Global Work, the effect globalization has had a on the retail business and how important it is for companies to adapt this new market culture. He also reveals his thoughts on corporate culture versus national culture and the difficulties in keeping out bureaucracy, complacency in a steadily growing corporation. Listen as Dahlvig shares the unique vision he relied on to lead IKEA through its best and worst times.

Alexandra Levit on Finding the Job and Employment Success

Jan 24, 2019

Alexandra Levit, author of the book Blind Spots: Ten Business Myths You Can’t Afford to Believe on Your New Path to Success discusses her book in which she points out the biggest myths of business success and the things people believe that don’t work for most of the truly successful. In this edition of Edgewise, Levit touches on how the recession has transformed our ideas about how business works and why these myths are more dangerous than ever in a compromised economy. She also stresses the importance of self-promotion in the workplace and the pitfalls to climbing the ladder too quickly, as well as the greatest obstacles facing employees and entrepreneurs in the coming years. She alsao talks about personal censorship and online transparency, and why it’s important to be aware of what you disclose publicly.

Jane Jordan on Managing Media Through a Crisis

Jan 24, 2019

Jane Jordan, author of the book The Four Stages of Highly Effective Crisis Management, says that every company should have a crisis communication plan. With the development of social media and new forms of immediate communication, it is even more important than ever. What was once the province of professional reporters is now free and available to everyone.  Regardless of a company’s preferred talking points, anyone can hit “post” instantly, as there are fewer and fewer communication boundaries. However, if you have a plan, Jordan says it’s possible to be prepared and successfully manage a communication crisis as in the cases involving the Red Cross or BP.

Dr. Betsy Kruger on Finding and Targeting Your Star Customers

Jan 24, 2019

Dr. Betsy Kruger, author of the book Top Market Strategy: Applying the 80/20 Rule, explains how businesses can use this system to quadruple their profits. She also discusses a commonly overlooked but key factor in increasing profit: customer loyalty. Stressing the importance of gaining quality customer relations as opposed to mere mass, Dr. Kruger explains how to identify the customers in the top 20% and how to specifically target them with your marketing strategy. She discusses on how companies such as Subway and Harley Davidson have used this method to create a win-win scenario for the brand and consumer.

Lina Echeverria on Fostering a Culture of Ideas

Jan 24, 2019

It takes an understanding culture to foster creativity. Lina Echeverria, author of the new AMACOM book Idea Agent, knows how it feels to fight for creative input. Now that she's in a leadership position, she does her best to make sure her teams don't feel the same aggravation she's experienced. Team members need to know they're safe to vocalize their ideas and, even if those ideas aren't eventually accepted, they feel heard.

Scott Belsky on His Principles of Success

Jan 24, 2019

Scott Belsky, founder and CEO of the Behance Network and author of Making Ideas Happen, joins us on Edgewise to discuss practicing and maintaining his principles of success. Flat organizations such as Behance divide responsibility and ownership over specific tasks and empower people on all levels of the organization to make the final call. Sharing ideas liberally is the best practice he has observed working among people across multiple organizations in multiple industries. It’s like the human body’s natural immune system: it kills off anything new. So to maintain the rapport of a team we need to remain alert and consider the ideas and input of everyone.

Jim Collins and Mort Hansen on Flourishing in Uncertainty

Jan 24, 2019

Jim Collins and Mort Hansen, coauthors of the book Great By Choice, discuss their research on fundamental business concepts and why some companies excel in chaos, turbulence, and uncertainty while others do not. Collins describes it as the most fascinating analysis that he’s ever been associated with in nearly twenty five years of research. Some of those fascinating insights include the role of luck and innovation, their “triad of behaviors”, as well as firing your “bullets” and then firing your “cannonballs.”  Companies like IBM, Microsoft, Southwest and Pacific Airlines have used these techniques with great success.

Paul Laudicina on Continuous Organizational Transformation

Jan 24, 2019

Paul A. Laudicina, chairman of A.T. Kearney, joins us on Edgewise to discuss the transformation of the company, from a subsidiary of a global service firm to a management-owned company, and many of the lessons he learned along the way. Laudicina shares the steps he took to rebuild the company’s business model and reconstitute the organization. He explains the importance of aligning a common set of values and principles unique to your DNA, having a robust strategic planning process which considers all variables, and an organizational culture that is clearly identifiable from the outside looking in. He stresses that it is a continuous process of change and to be prepared to shift direction as required by the business environment and its conditions.

John Baldoni on Developing a More Effective Leader

Jan 24, 2019

John Baldoni joins us on Edgewise to discuss his latest book titled “The Leader’s Pocket Guide: 101 Indispensible Tools, Tips, Techniques For Any Situation.” The book teaches you how to become a more effective leader by focusing on developing yourself, colleagues, and the organization. He explains the importance of critical thinking, self-selection and presence when connecting with your colleagues and shares the mantras he uses to influence others: competence, credibility, and confidence.

Lisa Bodell on Effecting Change and Driving Innovation

Jan 24, 2019

Lisa Bodell joins us on Edgewise to discuss her new book Kill the Company. The book is designed for anyone trying to make a positive change within their company and gives them quick and easy ways to approach innovation. Bodell states that no matter what your title or role, you can effect change and drive innovation through simplification rather than complication.

Sander Flaum on Finding Success in Today’s Job Market

Jan 24, 2019

Sander Flaum joins us on Edgewise to discuss his new book The Best Thing That Ever Happened to You:  How a Career Reversal Can Reinvigorate Your Life. Flaum covers today’s biggest myths about the job market and how to cope with the emotional devastation of losing a job. He also points out the single most important thing you have to do to distinguish yourself from the other competitors, how to begin that daunting process of finding a new job, including why most cover letters today are “just awful,” as well as tips on getting the best interview possible.

Sharon Melnick on Success Under Stress

Jan 24, 2019

Work-life balance is always a struggle. Even if you manage to get out of your office at a decent hour, nagging thoughts about work left over will creep into time that is meant to be relaxing. Sharon Melnick, frequent webinar subject matter expert and author of the new book Success Under Stress, has practical and effective ways to leave work at work and get rid of stress altogether.

Ted Harro on Crucial Conflicts

Jan 24, 2019

If you're working on a team that's trying to accomplish big things, a little conflict is unavoidable. Actually, according to Ted Harro, it's preferable. To him, if there isn't a single disagreement among co-workers on a big project, someone is lying and frustration is festering. Productive, project-based conflict is a sign of engagement and passion. If you learn to pick your battles and stay focused, groups can have disagreements while still working as a team.

Emily Bennington on the Myth of Having It All

Jan 24, 2019

"Having it all" is the mark, supposedly, of a successful woman, but what does it mean? Considering work-life balance, what does "having it all" really mean? Emily Bennington, author of the new AMACOM book Who Says It's a Man's World, says that it depends on the woman and it is not an unobtainable goal. Yes, you can have it all.

Edward Reilly on the AMA Business Boot Camp

Jan 24, 2019

American Management Association is about to turn 90 years old and the information in our seminars is as relevant as ever. Whether you're a new manager who is just starting out or an experienced leader who wants to refresh their skills, there's something useful in the AMA Business Boot Camp, published by AMACOM. In this program Edward T. Reilly, the book's editor and CEO of American Management Association, explores many popular and important topics in the book, including leadership and project management, and how they're still relevant today.

Jake Breeden on Tipping Sacred Cows

Jan 24, 2019

Some workplace virtues are not as beneficial as they seem. Jake Breeden talks about the pitfalls and the duality of some of those workplace virtues that seem helpful at first but cause more harm than good in the long term. He also discusses the best way to avoid those unintended consequences by discussing the positive and negative of each workplace virtue and how to find their right balance

Jeremy Goldman on Going Social

Jan 24, 2019

Social media is the go-to tool for businesses to connect to their customers. However, many businesses use the wrong type of social media or lose sight of what is important to their business model. Join Jeremy Goldman, author of the book Going Social, as he talks about the traps and pitfalls a business may face when trying to establish a social media presence. Remember social media is just a tool, don’t lose sight of your business and give in to the hype.

Jim Leighton on Getting FIT

Jan 24, 2019

Are you a TGIF kind of worker or for you is it TGIM, Thank God It’s Monday? It might have to do with how much passion you have for your work. If your values and principles don’t align with your company’s, you might not be as successful in the workplace as you might think, your lack of enthusiasm eventually becoming apparent to everyone you work with. Jim Leighton, author of Getting FIT, advocates a Fully Integrated Team (FIT) as a more dynamic style where every member of the group tries their best to contribute to the mutual goal by bringing their own personal experience and skill set to get the job done.

Robert Atkinson on Innovation Economics

Jan 24, 2019

Lately, American business has stagnated, resorting to short-sighted strategies and opting to take inexpensive or safer quick fixes rather than analyzing and fixing the root of a problem. Robert Atkinson thinks the U.S. could  learn from such countries as France, Germany, Finland, and Korea about how their focus on innovation has made them leaders in the business world. American business can turn this trend around by following Atkinson's 3 main factors that facilitate a healthy successful environment for innovation to get America back on to the list of top innovators.

Pamela Ryckman on Women Networking Outside the Company

Jan 24, 2019

Traditionally men have dominated the C-suite with one token spot open for a woman, if that. This made it nearly impossible for women to network within their organization as, at the end of the day, only one of them would get the corner office. This forced women to network outside their companies, but it turned out to be a blessing in disguise: women made different connections that led to unexpected lateral career moves, paving their own way to success. Pamela Ryckman, author of the book Stiletto Network, investigated this trend and talks about how modern women network and achieve success, starting from the entry level to moving up.

William Seidman on What Drives Star Employees

Jan 24, 2019

There's an easy way to pinpoint a Star Employee: It's the person you wish you could clone to do every job in the company. While that's wishful thinking, Stars tend to have an effect on the people around them and their enthusiasm becomes infectious.  William Seidman, coauthor with Richard Grbavac of The Star Factor, published by AMACOM, says that it's the Stars' outlook that is the deciding factor. They don't see themselves as cogs in the machine but a vital asset to the entire organization. As soon as their mindset improves, so do results. In this episode William shares tips on how to find out what drives the Star Employees and how to get their coworkers to become Stars as well.

Donny Ebenstein on the Other Side of the Story

Jan 24, 2019

When it's time to ask your boss for a promotion or a raise, the conventional wisdom is to role play the conversation with a friend standing in for your boss to give you a chance to script what you want to say. Donny Ebenstein has some unconventional wisdom: switch places, and put yourself in your boss's shoes. This approach to communication, understanding the point of view of the person you're talking to, is the cornerstone of Donny's new book I Hear You, published by AMACOM, where communication isn't just about hearing but also about understanding.

John Baldoni on Speaking with Presence

Jan 24, 2019

According to most studies, the number one fear, more than death, is public speaking. Most of this fear happens before a presentation is made. John Baldoni, author of the new book, The Leaders Guide to Speaking with Presence (Published by AMACOM), has some tips that will change your outlook on making a presentation, putting you in control and making it easier to walk out on that stage.

Kimberly Palmer on Cultivating Your Side Business

Jan 24, 2019

The Internet has made it easier than ever to have a side business: a craft shop on Etsy, freelance design work, social media consultant, etc. But with all the horror stories about jobs lost because of a social media presence, some people are scared to start a side gig, afraid of angering their main employer. Kimberly Palmer, author of the AMACOM book, The Economy of You, says you don't have to be afraid. In fact, a lot of employers enthusiastically welcome side businesses as an opportunity for their employers to learn, grow and bring more skills back to the workplace.

Jennifer Kahnweiler on Quiet Influence

Jan 24, 2019

Introverts can have trouble getting recognition for their accomplishments. They do great work but they do their best work quietly and alone. Skills like writing and research are crucial but not always attention grabbing. Jennifer Kahnweiler, author of the new book Quiet Influence: The Introvert's Guide to Making a Difference, has practical tips on how introverts can play to their strengths and still get the attention they deserve.

Scott Adams on a Humorous Workplace

Jan 24, 2019

Scott Adams is the creator of the ubiquitous workplace comic strip Dilbert, a character so iconic that he's become an actual metric for judging workplace happiness. If the walls contain too many Dilbert comics, employees probably relate to the character too much. However, if there are no comics, it's likely indicative of upper management with no sense of humor. Adam's humor comes from real experience. He's no stranger to the corporate lifestyle and isn't uncritical, calling leadership in general "a form of specialized evil."

Doug Conant on Making Connections from Top to Bottom

Jan 24, 2019

Doug Conant has a certain methodology for collaborating and communicating with his employees. As the former CEO of Campbell Soup Company, Doug set the tone for how he wanted to build his relationships there. For Conant, it is imperative to build his relationships before he needs to, so as to be more productive in the long run. And not just with his direct reports; he made time in his day to send notes to employees around the world that he would never see day to day. Build that trust early, and then anything is possible. All it takes is two simple strategies to be an effective leader: being tough-minded on standards and performances while remaining tenderhearted with people.

Mike Myatt on Hacking Leadership to Keep the Best Employees

Jan 24, 2019

Businesses, projects, and people don’t fail. Leaders fail. Mike Myatt, author of Hacking Leadership and a columnist for Forbes’s “Leadership,” discusses critical gaps leaders struggle with today, including development, influence, and reality gaps. Leaders never truly reach leadership maturity because they are all a work in progress. They must learn and understand their strengths and weaknesses in order to develop into more effective leaders. Leaders who tend to focus on process rather than people rarely see their company experience rising profits and often create a dynamic where employees decide to look elsewhere to unleash their passions, engage their creativity, and develop their skills. 

Chris Monteiro on Taking Social Media Seriously

Jan 24, 2019

Chris Monteiro, head of MasterCard Worldwide Communications, shares communication strategies that companies should use to help drive growth. Monteiro is in charge of supporting global communications integration, helping the company achieve its vision of a world beyond cash. MasterCard, whose revenues have now reached 60% internationally after going public in 2006, has embraced purposeful listening to inform its business decisions. Learn as Monteiro provides concrete examples of how listening to consumer needs through various online platforms actually helps to improve products. Tracking over 80,000 related social media comments for its Mobile Payments option a few years ago helped MasterCard learn about the product’s reputation. In turn, MasterCard refined the product, delivering a solution that met each of its customer’s needs.

Georg Vielmetter and Yvonne Sell on Megatrends You Need to Understand

Jan 24, 2019

Georg Vielmetter and Yvonne Sell, co-authors of Leadership 2030: The Six Megatrends You Need to Understand to Lead Your Company into the Future, published by AMACOM, share with us their analysis of the six megatrends affecting organizations today. Leaders must adapt to the ever-changing global climate in order to survive, and to do so they have to recognize these factors. Georg and Yvonne discuss the new wave of globalization, the environmental crisis affecting the whole world, the increasing demand for individualization, the boom in digitalization in more social aspects than ever before, the demographic shift in the workplace, and finally, the technological convergence of expanding fields such as nanotechnology and cognitive sciences.

Adam Toporek on Being Your Customer's Hero

Jan 24, 2019

Customer service isn't always the most glamorous job. It usually only makes the news when something has gone horribly wrong or over-the-top indulgent. However, there's a happy medium, says Adam Toporek, author of Be Your Customer's Hero, published by AMACOM. Being a hero to your customers isn't about grand publicity stunts. It's about being there for your customers when they need you.

Adam Gordon on Being Future Savvy

Jan 24, 2019

In order to succeed in their industries, decision-makers today need to anticipate the future outcomes not only in their own industry but also in society and technology as well. Futures analyst Adam Gordon has spent a lifetime deciphering changes and trends in a variety of industries. His book Future Savvy (AMACOM) is a hands-on guide for how to evaluate the business, social, and technology forecasts in both the mainstream media and specialized reporting. Adam Gordon MS, MBA (INSEAD) is an acknowledged and credentialed expert in the field of industry foresight and future studies. He has been an analyst, consultant, facilitator, and teacher in this field during the past dozen years, during which he has developed various foresight projects to help private and public-sector organizations anticipate and respond to emerging opportunities. Gordon has appeared on NPR's Morning Edition and CNN World Report, in addition to a number of radio shows worldwide. He has written many op-ed pieces and has been featured or serialized in various newspapers, including, most recently, The Times (London). As the director of The Future Studio, he facilitates industry foresight seminars, and teaches strategic planning in various prominent executive and MBA programs around the world. He was previously a Senior Associate at Coates & Jarratt, Inc., a future strategy consulting firm in Washington, DC., and before that, a journalist at Business Report.

Al Pittampalli on How to Be Persuadable

Jan 24, 2019

Flip-flopping has been seen as a negative trait for years. Al Pittampalli, author of the new book Persuadable, is here to tell you that being able to change your mind is not a weakness. In a world that is changing faster than ever, being able to adapt your thinking to new evidence is actually a strength and a very important one.

Alan Willett on Leading the Unleadable

Jan 24, 2019

We've all worked with someone who was a diva or a Debbie Downer. Sometimes we wonder why we don't just fire them. Alan Willett is here to defend them: they usually have a good reason and there were warning signs all along. Alan joins us with some advice from his new book, Leading the Unleadable, published by AMACOM, on how to course correct on those problem employees.

Annie McKee on Becoming a Resonant Leader

Jan 24, 2019

Exceptional leaders capture passion. They lead for real: from the heart, smart and focused on the future, and with a commitment to being their very best. A new book, Becoming a Resonant Leader, by Annie McKee, Richard Boyatzis and Frances Johnston, talks about the concept of leadership resonance. Through resonance, leaders become attuned to the needs and dreams of people they lead. They create conditions where people can excel. Annie McKee is co-founder of the Teleos Leadership Institute and teaches at the University of Pennsylvania Graduate School of Education.

Ash Seddeek on Being a Leader of Leaders

Jan 24, 2019

AMA Faculty member and author Ash Seddeek joins us to review some of FranklinCovey's 7 Habits and share some of the things he's learned from his years as an executive coach. and trainer

Asi Burak on Learning from Video Games

Jan 24, 2019

Good news! All that time you've spent playing video games is actually good for you. Asi Burak, coauthor, along with Laura Parker, of Power Play: How Video Games Can Change the World, is here to talk about how playing video games can be beneficial to learning as well as what other companies should be learning from the video game industry.

Barry Libert on How "We" Are Smarter Than "Me"

Jan 24, 2019

Online Social Networking is a reality. The millions of people who have a Facebook or MySpace page, or anyone who uses Wikipedia or Google, knows this. But for today's companies, the question remains, how can we profit from the crowds who are swarming all over the internet? Drawing on their own research and the insights from an enormous community of more than 4,000 people, Barry Libert and Jon Spector have written a book that reveals what works, and what doesn't, when you are building community into your decision making and business processes. In their book We Are Smarter Than Me, you will discover exactly how to use social networking and community in your business, driving better decision-making and greater profitability. Barry Libert is an industry veteran with more than 25 years of executive and growth company leadership experience. Barry is currently the CEO of Mzinga, a provider of business social networks that help companies improve their performance by leveraging the power of "community." In this week's You've Been Spotted segment, Kevin Lee asks participants from AMA's course "Critical Thinking" about how to gain knowledge and insights by working with others. Listen to these participants share what theyve learned from the course.

Ben Parr on How to Get and Maintain Attention

Jan 24, 2019

Ben Parr, author of Captivology: The Science of Capturing People's Attention, joins us with multiple case studies of brands and organizations who used marketing and social media effectively to keep the public's attention. Whether it's a 75 year old brand or a charity organization or an individual contributor, we all need attention, to be listened to, to get anything done.

Beverly Kaye on Keeping Ideal People in the Workplace

Jan 24, 2019

With every employee who walks out the door costing the company up to 200 percent of their annual salary to replace, retention is one of the most important issues facing businesses today. Because finding the ideal person for every workplace position has become an increasingly difficult task, the retention of top employees has become every manager's concern. Love 'Em or Lose 'Em, by organizational-development specialists Beverly L. Kaye and Sharon Jordan-Evans, proposes that this "race for talent" can be effectively run only by those who adopt programs and policies that truly support their personnel. Beverly Kaye, president of Beverly Kaye & Associates, Inc., is an organizational consultant with over 20 years of experience in career development, management training, and human resource planning. She is also the president of Career Systems International, a career development publishing company, the author of Up Is Not the Only Way, and the coauthor of Designing Career Development Systems. She is coauthor, with Sharon Jordan-Evans, of Love 'Em or Lose 'Em: Getting Good People to Stay.

Bill George on Discovering Your True North

Jan 24, 2019

To be able to orient your worldview and move forward you need to be able to accept your past. Bill George joins us with numerous examples of leaders who have accepted their past, warts and all, and used that narrative to move forward in the world to become the global leaders they are today.

Bob Kulhan on Honing Your Improv Skills

Jan 24, 2019

We often think about improvisation in the context of comedy and it has nothing to do with the average workplace. But you've actually used improv tools more than you probably think. Bob Kulhan, improv pro in and out of the office, is here to talk about how to add these crucial skills to your toolkit.

Bob Nease on The Power of 50 Bits

Jan 24, 2019

Our brains are wired to be reactionary and instinctual. While this has mostly been helpful it does make it hard to change some ingrained behaviors we'd like to correct. Bob Nease, author of the new book The Power of 50 Bits, talks about how to course-correct to more healthy habits.

Bob Nelson on Sparking Motivation and Initiative in Your Team and Yourself

Jan 24, 2019

Bob Nelson is an international recognized expert on finding these kinds of simple yet powerful ways to motivate people at work. Nelson is founder and president of Nelson Motivation, Inc., a management training and consulting firm based in San Diego, California. He is author of the best-selling books 1001 Ways to Reward Employees   which has sold over 1.5 million copies worldwide - 1001 Ways to Energize Employees and 1001 Ways to Take Initiative at Work. Dr. Nelson has been featured extensively in the media, including television appearances on CNN, CNBC, PBS, and MSNBC; radio appearances on NPR, USA Radio Network and the Business News Network; and print appearances in The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, The Washington Post, The Chicago Tribune, Fortune magazine and many more. He writes a weekly column for American City Business Journals and a monthly column for Corporate Meetings &Incentives, among others. Dr. Nelson received his Ph.D. in management from The Peter F. Drucker Graduate Management Center of Claremont Graduate University in suburban Los Angeles, where his doctoral research was on "Factors that Encourage or Inhibit the Use of Non-Monetary Recognition by U.S. Managers." He received his MBA in organizational behavior from The University of California at Berkeley, and holds a BA in communications. In this week's You've Been Spotted segment, Kevin Lee interviews participants from AMA's seminar "Leadership Skills For Supervisors". Listen to these participants share which types of rewards and recognition matters to them and their employees.

Chris Kuenne & John Danner on Knowing Your Growth Type

Jan 24, 2019

Chris Kuenne & John Danner, co-authors of the new book Built for Growth, have created a new assessment for entrepreneurs and they can you to try it out. They've identified the four types of entrepreneurial leaders and how they work. Listen to the episode and then check out their quiz to put the curiosity of who you are in the context of building a business.

Chuck Martin on Our Third Digital Transformation

Jan 24, 2019

We are currently in the era of the Internet of Things. What does that mean and how does it affect us? Chuck Martin joins us to talk about his new book Digital Transformation 3.0 and what it means for us as workers and as employees.

Cindy Rabe on the Challenge to Innovate

Jan 24, 2019

In her book The Innovation Killer: How What We Know Limits What We Can Imagine and What Smart Companies Are Doing About It (AMACOM), Cindy Rabe talks about how to defeat the kind of thinking that can overcome teams and kill true innovation. Cindy offers insights on how to find and work with the right people and shows, through fascinating real-world examples, the huge difference they can make. Cindy Rabe held the position of Innovation Strategist for Intel Corporation until early 2006 when she founded Zero-G, a company that contributes and stimulates breakthrough insights that lead to innovations and improvements in all areas of business.

C.K. Prahalad and M.S. Krishnan on the New Age of Innovation

Jan 24, 2019

In their new book The New Age of Innovation: Driving Cocreated Value Through Global Networks, authors C.K. Prahalad and M.S. Krishnan argue that the key to creating value and the future growth of every business depends on accessing a global network of resources to co-create unique experiences with customers, one at a time. To achieve this, CEOs, executives, and managers at every level must transform their business processes, technical systems, and supply chain management, implementing key social and technological infrastructure requirements to create an ongoing innovation advantage. Dr. C.K. Prahalad was born in the town of Coimbatore in Tamil Nadu. He studied physics at the University of Madras (now Chenai). He worked as a manager in a branch of the Union Carbide battery company, before continuing his education in the United States, and earning a PhD from Harvard. He has taught in India and America, eventually joining the faculty of the University of Michigan's Business School, where he holds the Harvey C Fruehauf chair of Business Administration. Dr. M. S. Krishnan is Mary and Mike Hallman e-Business Fellow, Area Chairman and Professor of Business Information Technology at the University of Michigan Business School. Dr, Krishnan is also a Co-Director of the Center for Global Resource Leverage:India at the Michigan Business School. Dr. Krishnan received his Ph.D. in Information Systems from the Graduate School of Industrial Administration, Carnegie Mellon University in 1996. He was awarded the ICIS Best Dissertation Prize for his Doctoral Thesis on "Cost and Quality Considerations in Software Product Management". His research interest includes Corporate IT strategy, Business value of IT investments, and management of distributed business processes, software engineering economics, metrics and measures for quality, productivity and customer satisfaction for products in software and information technology industries.

Crystal Kadakia on The Millennial Myth

Jan 24, 2019

There has been and probably always will be a culture clash when a new generation enters the workforce. With new technologies emerging every day, the clash between Millennials and their elders seems more pronounced than ever. Crystal Kadakia, author of the new book The Millennial Myth, joins us to talk about some companies that are accepting the cultural differences between generations and adapting to the changing workforce.

Dan Ariely on Understanding the Logic Behind Illogical Decisions

Jan 24, 2019

Irrational behavior is a part of human nature, but as MIT professor Dan Ariely has discovered in 20 years of researching behavioral economics, people tend to behave irrationally in a predictable fashion. Drawing on psychology and economics, behavioral economics can show us why cautious people make poor decisions about sex when aroused, why patients get greater relief from a more expensive drug over its cheaper counterpart and why honest people may steal office supplies or communal food, but not money. According to Ariely, our understanding of economics, now based on the assumption of a rational subject, should, in fact, be based on our systematic, unsurprising irrationality. In his new book Predictably Irrational, Ariely argues that greater understanding of previously ignored or misunderstood forces (emotions, relativity and social norms) that influence our economic behavior brings a variety of opportunities for reexamining individual motivation and consumer choice, as well as economic and educational policy.

Dan Carrison on Management Secrets of the FBI

Jan 24, 2019

In its one hundred-year fight against the ever-changing tactics of organized crime and terrorism, the Federal Bureau of Investigation has learned invaluable lessons about powerful leadership and management. Like many organizations, the FBI must succeed on a global playing field with limited resources; it must deal with unforeseen challenges and long-term strategic threats. Former Marine Dan Carrison has had unprecedented access to the inner workings of the FBI. In his book From the Bureau to the Boardroom, he offers an insider's look at the Bureau, taking readers behind the scenes of some of the FBI's most important missions-from infiltrating a world-wide drug cartel to closing in on a terrorist cell. Dan Carrison is a partner of Semper Fi Consulting (SemperFiConsulting.com) and is the founder of ghostwritersinthesky.com. He is a nationally recognized speaker and business writer and is the coauthor of the best-selling Semper Fi: Business Leadership the Marine Corps Way.

Dan Coughlin on Accelerating Your Leadership

Jan 24, 2019

In his new book Accelerate management consultant Dan Coughlin collects his experiences from over 3,000 hours of executive coaching in over 20 industries. He distills them into 20 lessons for executives and managers looking to catapult their careers and grow their businesses. Dan is president of the Coughlin Company, a consulting firm specializing in business acceleration, working with companies such as AT&T, Boeing, Citigroup, and the St. Louis Cardinals. In this week's You've Been Spotted segment, Kevin Lee interviews participants from AMA's "Advanced Executive Leadership program. Listen to these participants share new approaches, tools, strategies that they've gained from the course.

Dan Miller on Saying Goodbye to the Monday Morning Blues

Jan 24, 2019

The only way to find true security is by following your calling and then finding or creating work that matches your passion. Dan Miller's new book No More Mondays addresses people looking for guidance on how to launch a new career or business, those who want to stay in their current jobs and give the old 9-to-5 model a twenty-first-century makeover, and managers desperate to understand the way people want to work today. For all of them, Dan Miller's message is loud and clear: If you're one of those people who dread going to work on Mondays, do something about it! Dan Miller is the author of the bestselling 48 Days to the Work You Love book, workbook, and audio program. As a life coach, he has guided people through the anguish of unexpected change to the exhilaration of meaningful work and increased time and financial freedom. Dan has appeared on CBS's The Early Show and MSNBCs Hardball with Chris Matthews. To learn more, read these AMACOM Books: * Myself and Other More Important Matters, by Charles Handy * Finding & Keeping Great Employees, by Jim Harris, Ph.D., Joan Brannick, Ph.D. * The Loyalty Advantage by Dianne Michonski Durkin * The Joy of Retirement: Finding Happiness, Freedom, and the Life You've Always Wanted by David C. Borchard

Dr Patti Fletcher on Women Disrupting the Workplace

Jan 24, 2019

Disrupters, the new book by Dr. Patti Fletcher is called the "anti-Lean In." Not because women should stay put, far from it. Dr. Fletcher is seeking a new way forward, one that doesn't rely on women simply emulating the way that men have traditionally behaved. She joins us to talk about how women and men can change their behavior to make the workforce more accommodating for all.

Drew Dudley on Everyday Leadership

Jan 24, 2019

The understanding of what it takes to be a leader is both overly broad and too specific. We focus on lone, mythical, usually white, male figures and discount the leadership abilities inherent in all of us. Drew Dudley, author of the new book This is Day One, joins us to share his definition of a leader and how we can start acting like one today.

Ed Koch on Building Buzz

Jan 24, 2019

In his three terms as mayor, Ed Koch brought the city of New York out of bankruptcy, created a renowned housing program, and paved the way to the city's ongoing economic and cultural prosperity. How did he rise from relative obscurity to become an enduring icon of America's largest city? In his new book Buzz: How to Build It and Win With It (AMACOM), Koch shares the secrets of his success that will help readers everywhere become masters of self-marketing. With his legendary candor and in-your face style, he reveals how anyone can use his techniques to attract the right kind of attention in order to achieve positive and lasting results.

Ed Wallace on Becoming a Relational Leader

Jan 24, 2019

Networking is an essential business skill. After you get that business card though, what happens next. Ed Wallace, author of The Relationship Engine, published by AMACOM, is here to talk about how to plan to build up your relationship capital and take your networking to the next level.

Edgewise Is Going on Hiatus

Jan 24, 2019

When we think about inspirational leaders we tend to think about the big dreamers and the iconoclasts. It seems like it's impossible to be inspiring ourselves. Kristi Hedges, author of the new book The Inspiration Code, joins us to talk about how we can make our words and actions more inspiring to others.

Edward Hess on Finding a Role for Humanity

Jan 24, 2019

Automation and robotics are coming to the workforce and they're poised to be as disruptive as the industrial revolution. Where will humans fit in to this new world of work? Edward Hess, coauthor along with Katherine Ludwig of the new book Humility is the New Smart: Rethinking Human Excellence in the Smart Machine Age, joins us to talk about job opportunities for a newly automatic world.

Edward Lawler on Making People Your Competitive Advantage

Jan 24, 2019

In today's global business environment, it's more and more difficult to gain a competitive edge, but it's not impossible. Talent, potentially the most powerful source of competitive advantage, is available. In Talent: Making People Your Competitive Advantage, the follow up to his best selling book, Built To Change, Edward Lawler shows how organizations can combine the right organization design, management practices, and talent to gain a critical performance edge. Edward E. Lawler III is Distinguished Professor of Business at the University of Southern California Marshall School of Business and founder and director of the University's Center for Effective Organizations (CEO). CEO has been recognized by Fortune and other publications as one of the country's leading management research organizations. BusinessWeek has proclaimed Lawler one of the top six gurus in the field of management, and Human Resource Executive called him one of HR's most influential people. Workforce magazine identified him as one of the twentyfive visionaries who have shaped today's workplace over the past century. Professor Lawler is the author and co-author of 43 books. His most recent works include Talent: Making People Your Competitive Advantage and Built to Change: How to Achieve Sustained Organizational Effectiveness, which was co-authored with Christopher G. Worley. Professor Lawler is the recipient of many awards including SHRM's Michael R. Losey award for which he was the first recipient. He is also a consultant to many governments and corporations including the majority of the Fortune 100.

Erich Joachimsthaler on Opportunities Hidden in Plain Sight

Jan 24, 2019

In his book Hidden in Plain Sight, Erich Joachimsthaler explains how you can spot opportunities that too often are overlooked. The book introduces the demand-first innovation and growth (DIG) model that shows how to become an unbiased observer of people's consumption and usage behaviors. Refining this skill helps companies generate organic growth through new products, services, solutions, and experiences that truly enhance peoples' lives. Erich is the Founder and Chief Executive Officer of Vivaldi Partners, a global strategy, innovation, and marketing firm. In this week's You've Been Spotted segment, Kevin Lee asks participants from AMA's course "Strategic Planning"about what opportunities they've found that were hidden in plain sight. Listen to these participants share what they've learned from the course.

Ernest Gundling on the Global Workplace

Jan 24, 2019

More and more we're working regularly with people in different countries with different cultures. Being able to adapt our way of working is a new competitive advantage. Ernest Gundling is here with some tips for how to adapt our way of working with those of our colleagues around the world.

Esther Choy on Letting the Story Do the Work

Jan 24, 2019

Stories have a beginning, a middle, and an end, that's it. However, there is some nuance that can make a blah story into a memorable one. Esther Choy, author of Let the Story Do the Work, published by AMACOM, joins us with some ways to punch up your storytelling skills that will have people eager to hear more.

Frank Pietrucha on How to Be a Supercommunicator

Jan 24, 2019

Technology is changing our vocabulary, creating new acronyms, buzzwords, and concepts every day. It can be hard to keep up. Frank Pietrucha, author of Supercommunicator, published by AMACOM, has plenty of tips on how to explain our technical knowledge to nontechnical listeners.

Fred Kofman on The Meaning Revolution

Jan 24, 2019

Can everyone run a marathon? Yes and no. A lot of people can but not tomorrow, not without training. The ones that want to will put in the work. To Fred Kofman, the same metric applies to leadership. It takes effort but the ones who put in the time will be able to learn how. He joins us to talk about some more of his leadership insights from his new book The Meaning Revolution.

G. Michael Campbell on Ensuring Project Success

Jan 24, 2019

G. Michael Campbell has found that there is one fairly reliable predictor of project success: communication. If you have good, open communication with the stakeholders involved in your project you are more likely to see the project through to completion. And vice versa. He joins us today to talk about his new book Succeeding with Senior Management, published by AMACOM, and how to translate project management speak into senior management speak.

Geoffrey Colon on Disruptive Marketing

Jan 24, 2019

Today on Edgewise Geoffrey Colon, author of the new AMACOM book Disruptive Marketing, joins us for a freewheeling conversation about music, technology, ethics, and taking the fear out of failure.

Gordon Patzer on Why Looks Matter More than You Think

Jan 24, 2019

Dr. Gordon L. Patzer has devoted the last 30 years to investigating this unsettling phenomenon for both women and men, and how it touches every part of our lives. In his book Looks (AMACOM),he reveals not only its impact on romance but also on family dynamics, performance in school, career, courtroom proceedings, politics and government. Looks is the first book to explore how the power of beauty affects both sexes and how the rise of reality TV shows, cosmetic surgery, and celebrity culture have contributed to our overall obsession with being beautiful. Dr. Patzer has held various executive positions in and out of the academic world. He is currently dean of Chicago's Roosevelt University and is the founder and director of the Appearance Phenomenon Institute.

Dr. Patzer has investigated "lookism" and the physical attractiveness phenomenon for more than 30 years and has been featured in such publications as the Los Angeles Times, Harpers Bazaar, Mademoiselle, Elle, and Self Magazine. He has also been featured on Dateline NBC, The Today Show, and The O'Reilly Factor. In this week's "You've Been Spotted" segment, Kevin Lee asks participants from AMAs course "Presentation Skills for IT and Technical Professionals" about how much looks matter to their jobs. Listen to these participants share what they've learned from the course, and hear insights from Irv Rose, veteran instructor on presentation skills.

John Addison on a Leader's Positivity

Jan 24, 2019

Whenever someone would come to John Addison with a crisis he would always ask "how many people died?" The answer was always zero. It's all about perspective. It's easy to be a leader in good times but in the bad, the leaders with the positive attitude will be able to weather the storm.

John Baldoni on Moxie

Jan 24, 2019

Guts, gumption, and determination. That is what it takes to be a bold leader according to Author John Baldoni. In his new book entitled, MOXIE: The Secret to Bold and Gutsy Leadership, John discusses how we can all learn to be resilient when faced with difficult times during our careers in order to model a culture of a great succession.

James Kouzes on Rising to the Leadership Challenge

Jan 24, 2019

The Leadership Challenge, one of the best-selling leadership books of all time, is considered by many as the most trusted source on becoming a better leader. With this fourth edition, James M. Kouzes and Barry Z. Posner issue a new collection of case studies relevant to today's world to illustrate a timeless mission that all great leaders share. Kouzes and Posner offer up five basic points that the best leaders use to motivate. Jim Kouzes is an Executive Fellow at the Center for Innovation and Entrepreneurship at the Leavey School of Business, Santa Clara University. Jim is featured as one of the workplace experts in George Dixon's book , What Works at Work: Lessons from the Masters (1988) and in Learning Journeys: Top Management Experts Share Hard-Earned Lessons on Becoming Great Mentors and Leaders edited by Marshall Goldsmith, Beverly Kaye, and Ken Shelton (2000). Not only is he a highly regarded leadership scholar and an experienced executive, but The Wall Street Journal has cited him as one of the twelve most requested non-university executive education providers to U.S. companies.

James Parker on Doing the Right Thing at Southwest Airlines

Jan 24, 2019

People matter most, we all know that. But most companies would rather slash costs, cut headcount, replace well-paid employees with lower-paid employees or outsourced workers, and reduce customer service. In the wake of 9/11, Southwest Airlines was faced with a disastrous situation that threatened to ruin not only their business but the entire airline industry. In response, Southwest Airlines made three pivotal decisions: no layoffs, no pay cuts, and no-hassle refunds for any customer wanting them. The result: Southwest remained profitable, it was the only major airline to protect the jobs of all its employees, and Southwest's market cap soon exceeded all its major competitors combined. James F. Parker served as CEO of Southwest Airlines during that tumultuous period. In his new book DO THE RIGHT THING, Jim shows why "doing the right thing" by your employees and your customers isn't just na "feel-goodism: it's the most powerful rule for business success. His decisions grew naturally from Southwest's culture of mutual respect and trust. Parker offers deeply personal insights into that culture, demonstrating that it's really not that hard to Do The Right Thing! James F. Parker served as CEO and vice chairman of the board of Southwest Airlines from June 2001 through July 2004, three of the airline industry's most challenging years. During Parker's tenure as CEO, Southwest Airlines was named one of America's three most admired companies, one of America's 100 best corporate citizens, one of the world's most socially responsible companies, and worldwide airline of the year. He is a member of the MIT Leadership Center Advisory Council at the MIT Sloan School of Management. A lawyer by trade, he spent fifteen years as General Counsel of Southwest Airlines before being selected to lead the company. He is currently a member of the board of directors of Texas Roadhouse, Inc. In this week's "You've Been Spotted" segment, Kevin Lee asks participants in AMAs seminar "Leadership Skills for Supervisors" to describe their core values as leaders.

Joan Knutson on Linking Strategy, Execution and Project Management

Jan 24, 2019

Joan Knutson is founder and manager of Project Mentors, a successful multimillion dollar project management training and consulting firm. She is the author of Project Management: How to Plan and Manage Successful Project (AMACOM), Succeeding in Project-Driven Organizations: People, Processes, and Politics (John Wiley and Sons) and Project Management for Business Professionals: A Comprehensive Guide (John Wiley and Sons).

Joel Peterson on The 10 Laws of Trust

Jan 24, 2019

Culture drives performance. In a high-trust culture people are going to be more productive and innovative than a culture where they're constantly on high alert. Joel Peterson, co-author of The 10 Laws of Trust, published by AMACOM, is here to talk about how to cultivate a high-trust environment on your team.

Jane Linder on the Management Secrets Behind Wildly Successful Initiatives

Jan 24, 2019

Have you ever wondered why so-called best management practice produces mediocre results? What if a team wanted to do something truly spectacular? What if it wanted to make a real impact? In her new book Spiral Up. . . and Other Management Secrets Behind Wildly Successful Initiatives, Jane C. Linder argues that if you want to work wonders, you've got to abandon the accepted, linear, day-by-day management mindset and step into the real world. It's anything but mechanical. Jane Linder is president of the Progress Board, LLC, a consulting company that specializes in helping clients put good ideas to work. Dr. Linder has been a professor at Harvard Business School and spent more than a decade as an executive in the technology industry. Her articles have appeared in Harvard Business Review, MITs Sloan Management Review, and Across the Board, among others. Author of Outsourcing for Radical Change, she lives in Charlestown, Massachusetts. In this week's Youve Been Spotted segment, Kevin Lee interviews participants from AMA's seminar "Communicating Up Down and Across the Organization." Listen to these participants share how they achieve lasting results and grow influence through communication.

Jason Wingard on Keeping Up with Business Education

Jan 24, 2019

Jason Wingard, author of Learning to Succeed: Rethinking Corporate Education in a World of Unrelenting Change, has a formula for how to keep up with the ever-changing business environment. On this episode he lays out a concise training strategy and how to overcome barriers to learning integration, with great tips for how to keep up with the expanding global market.

Jathan Janove on Hard-Won Wisdom

Jan 24, 2019

Jathan Janove has learned a lot of things about employee retention, both from the inside as an HR expert and the outside as an employment litigator. He joins us to give some tips from his new book Hard-Won Wisom, published by AMACOM, including his definition of employee engagement and some things you can do right away to make your employees feel more understood and valued.

Jeanne Bliss on Treating Customers Like They're Your Mom

Jan 24, 2019

When we think of customer service we tend to focus on the front line employees who are taking the customer phone calls. While they are often the face of the organization, there are thousands of decisions made throughout the company than wind up making customers feel less-than great. Jeanne Bliss, author of the new book Would You Do That to Your Mother, says that treating customers with respect is something that needs to permeate the entire organization, from customer facing roles all the way to the CEO.

Jeff Rosenblum on Stopping Friction for Your Customers

Jan 24, 2019

Friction is an unfortunate part of life but it can be overcome. Jeff Rosenblum, co-director of the new documentary The Naked Brand, joins us to talk about the various kinds of friction we encounter and how brands can remove what is stopping their customers from making purchasing decisions.

Jennifer Kahnweiler on the Genius of Opposites

Jan 24, 2019

Introverts and extroverts have different and sometimes contradictory strengths. When they pair up and manage to find a way to work together, introverts and extroverts can create power teams. Jennifer Kahnweiler, Ph.D., author of the new book The Genius of Opposites, joins us again to give us examples of some of those dynamic duos and how they managed to work together.

Jim McCann on Conversational Leadership

Jan 24, 2019

James F. "Jim" McCann is an American entrepreneur who founded 1-800-Flowers, which was one of the first companies to pioneer and popularize the use of both toll-free telephone numbers and websites to sell goods and services directly to consumers.

Jim Champy on How to Outsmart Your Competition

Jan 24, 2019

Jim Champy inspired legions of business leaders with his bestseller Reengineering the Corporation. In his new book Outsmart!, Champy describes nine companies that have achieved breakthrough growth by consistently outsmarting the competition. Champy tells their fascinating success stories, revealing powerful, counterintuitive strategies for finding distinctive market positions and sustainable advantages for growth rates. Jim Champy is chairman of Perot Systems Corporations consulting practice and head of strategy for the company.

Kevin Eikenberry on The Long-Distance Leader

Jan 24, 2019

Whether you're working with gig workers or people in multiple offices worldwide, these days we're seeing more and more teams spread out across the globe. Technology makes remote teams easier but it can only help so much. Kevin Eikenberry, co-author of The Long-Distance Leader, joins us to talk about some of the challenges to working remotely, the expected ones and some that you might not have thought of.

Kevin Kelly on Optimism

Jan 24, 2019

Kevin Kelly wants you to be optimistic. Not just because things, on average, are always better than they have been. They are but there's a practical reason too. It's very hard to plan for the future when you have a pessimistic view. On this episode he urges you to take the long view and plan ahead, start working on that project that won't pay off this quarter or even this year but could make all the difference in the long term.

Kim Powell on Acting Like a CEO

Jan 24, 2019

"CEO" can seem like a venerated title but the people occupying those positions are less intimidating than you might think. Maybe don't march into their office unannounced and start chatting today, but CEOs are people who make mistakes and have weak spots, just like anyone. Kim Powell, along with her co-author Elena L. Botelho, interviewed thousands of CEOs and other leaders to get to understand the behaviors of those in leadership positions. She shares their findings with us and in her new book The CEO Next Door.

Kim Scott on Radical Candor

Jan 24, 2019

As a manager there's a fine line to walk between being friendly and being helpful. That line gets even more blurry for women in the workforce. Kim Scott, author of Radical Candor, joins us with how to walk that line, how to provide even negative feedback while still remembering your colleagues' humanity.

Kory Kogon on Using Technology Wisely

Jan 24, 2019

In this episode of AMA Edgewise, we talk to Kory Kogon one of the Co-Authors of The 5 Choices: The Path Extraordinary Productivity. Kory explains why it is both easier and harder to achieve extraordinary productivity. In a business world filled with technology made to increase productivity, those same tools somehow take control over your day. Kory Kogon and her Co-Authors illustrate the framework necessary to take back control of your workday through the 5-Choices.

Kristi Hedges on The Inspiration Code

Jan 24, 2019

When we think about inspirational leaders we tend to think about the big dreamers and the iconoclasts. It seems like it's impossible to be inspiring ourselves. Kristi Hedges, author of the new book The Inspiration Code, joins us to talk about how we can make our words and actions more inspiring to others.

Kristi Hedges on The Power of Presence

Jan 24, 2019

We all want to have a great presence but what does that look like. With the publication of the paperback of her classic book The Power of Presence, Kristi Hedges joins us to talk about how you can cultivate your own outstanding presence, no matter your personality.

Laurence Miller on Handling Difficult to Disturbed Employees

Jan 24, 2019

Every workplace is filled with a wide range of personalities. From Difficult to Disturbed (AMACOM), the new book by Dr. Laurence Miller, gives managers the insight, understanding, and tools they need to get the best from those who present the toughest problems. From Difficult to Disturbed helps readers become better managers by providing insight into both big and small people-problems that can seriously disrupt the workplace if they're not handled correctly. The book contains down-to-earth solutions for dealing with: 

  • Personality Types including avoidant, dependent, histrionic, narcissistic, or antisocial workers 
  • Common People Problems such as unproductive, angry, uncooperative, or chronic problem employees 
  • Mental Disorders such as depression, bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, anxiety and panic disorders, as well as alcohol and substance abuse

Laurence Miller, Ph.D. is a clinical and forensic psychologist, educator, author, speaker, and management consultant. He maintains a private practice in psychology and also works extensively with law enforcement, the judicial system, social service agencies, and private corporations. In this week's You've Been Spotted segment, Kevin Lee interviews participants from AMA's course "Improving Your Managerial Effectiveness". Listen to these participants share practices, tips and guidelines they've learned for dealing with difficult employees.

Leigh Stringer on The Healthy Workplace

Jan 24, 2019

Retention, recruiting, and even stock prices soar in companies that care about the health of their employees. Even when executives are looking to save every last penny of their budget, it pays to invest in the health and wellness of the people doing the day-to-day work. Leigh Stringer joins us to talk about her book, The Healthy Workplace, published by AMACOM, with some examples of companies who have done this successfully and some of their methods.

Len Sandler on Becoming an Extraordinary Manager

Jan 24, 2019

Nearly all managers dream of being inspiring leaders who elicit the most from their people. But while they may understand the skills needed to manage their teams, very few know how to put their knowledge into practice. Now, any manager can get exceptional results and make an important contribution to the organization. Becoming an Extraordinary Manager (AMACOM) by Len Sandler focuses not just on "understanding" principles of good management, but on taking action. Sandler (Westford, MA) is the president of Sandler Assoc. and has successfully developed and delivered more than 2,500 seminars for such clients as EMC, General Motors, Disney, AT&T, Johnson & Johnson, Motorola, General Electric, Hertz, Sun Microsystems, Honeywell, Citigroup, Lucent Technologies, Siemens, and Corning. In this week's You've Been Spotted segment, Kevin Lee asks participants from AMA's course "Management Skills for New Supervisors" about what they're learning to become extraordinary managers. Listen to these participants share what they've learned from the course.

Leonard Berry and Kent Seltman on Management Lessons from Mayo Clinic

Jan 24, 2019

The Mayo Clinic is one of the world's most prestigious organizations, one that fosters a culture that exceeds customer expectations and earns deep loyalty from both customers and employees. Service business authority Leonard Berry and Mayo Clinic marketing administrator Kent Seltman had the rare opportunity to study Mayo Clinic's service culture and systems from the inside by conducting personal interviews as well as observing hundreds of clinician-patient interactions. The result is Management Lessons from Mayo Clinic, a book about how the Clinic's business concept produces stellar clinical results, organizational efficiency, and interpersonal service. Leonard Berry, PhD, is Distinguished Professor of Marketing, and holds the M.B. Zale Chair in Retailing and Marketing Leadership in the Mays Business School at Texas A&M University. He is also Professor of Humanities in Medicine, College of Medicine, Texas A&M Health Science Center. Dr. Berry is the author of several service quality bestsellers and the recipient of the 2007 American Marketing Association/Irwin/McGraw-Hill Distinguished Marketing Educator Award and the 2008 Paul D. Converse Award. Kent Seltman, PhD, served as director of marketing at Mayo Clinic from 1992 through 2006. With more than 25 years of experience in healthcare marketing, Dr. Seltman writes and lectures frequently on marketing and branding. He also served as editor of Marketing Health Services, published by the American Marketing Association.

Leonard Mlodinow on Training Our Brains to Be More Elastic

Jan 24, 2019

At the two ends of the neurological spectrum are logical thinking and elastic thinking. Generally the purvue of artists and great thinkers, elastic thinking is called upon more and more in our everyday lives. Luckily, we are not born one way or another. Leonard Mlodinow, author of the book Elastic, joins us to talk about ways we can train our thinking to be less logical and make up our own rules.

Leonard Sherman on Considering Your Brand Long-Term

Jan 24, 2019

Customers needs are always changing. Even the most universal products get updated and each brand has to figure out how to change with the times. Leonard Sherman, author of If You’re in a Dogfight, Become a Cat!: Strategies for Long-Term Growth, joins us with lots of examples of companies doing it right and some of the ones who got it wrong.

Lindsey Pollak on Becoming the Boss

Jan 24, 2019

The millennial generation is rapidly becoming a large part of the managing workforce. Lindsey Pollak joins us to talk about her New York Times bestselling book: Becoming the Boss: New Rules for the Next Generation of Leaders. In her book, Lindsey talks about what steps we all need to take in order to facilitate a better work environment for all generations alike. Listen in, as Lindsey gives us some tips and insights on how to become a better manager as or for a millennial.

Lindsey Pollak on Getting from College to Career

Jan 24, 2019

In Getting from College to Career, Lindsey Pollak offers a definitive guide for building the experience, skills, and confidence needed for college graduates starting a major job search. Her 90 action-oriented tips include strategies ranging from the simple to the expert. Pollak is an author and speaker specializing in career advice and women's issues. She is the author of Getting from College to Career: 90 Things to Do Before You Join the Real World (HarperCollins, 2007) and coauthor with Diane K. Danielson of The Savvy Gal's Guide to Online Networking (Or, What Would Jane Austen Do?). Pollak writes Lindsey Pollak Blog and contributes columns to the Huffington Post. Her writing also has appeared in Marie Claire magazine, PINK magazine, Metro New York newspaper and numerous career advice Websites.

Lior Arussy on Embracing Change

Jan 24, 2019

People love to talk about innovation but when it comes to actually changing how we work, suddenly everyone starts dragging their feet. Lior Arussy, author of Next is Now, joins us to talk about the different ways we resist change, how to spot that resistance, and eventually how to overcome it.

Michael Lee Stallard on Connection Culture

Jan 24, 2019

Sometimes it can be tempting to keep your head down and just get the work done, especially with steadily increasing workloads. However, actually connecting with other human beings is crucial to our wellness and ability to perform. In his new book Connection Culture, Michael Lee Stallard talks about how lately we're less connected than ever and how to get some of that crucial connection time back.

Michael Lee Stallard on How to Fire Up Your Team’s Passion, Creativity and Productivity

Jan 24, 2019

Employee disengagement is a widespread malady in today's organizations, causing the loss of billions of dollars, hours of dissatisfaction and work lives lacking true value. Scientific research has validated the powerful effect of emotional connections on human beings. When individuals feel a connection with their organization's identity, their colleagues and their day-to-day tasks, it fires them up.

Michael Alter on Building Superior Customer Service

Jan 24, 2019

At SurePayroll, employees win money for making mistakes. Although this approach may seem a little backward, Michael Alter, president of the payroll provider, says the only way to continue to grow is to change and try new things—and it may account for the company’s fast growth, a three-year growth rate of 1.302 percent.

Michael Gates Gill on How Starbucks Saved His Life

Jan 24, 2019

Michael Gates Gill had it all. But by the time he turned 60, he had lost everything except his Ivy League education and his sense of entitlement. First he was downsized at work; next, an affair ended his 20 year marriage. Then he was diagnosed with a slow growing brain tumor. Gill had no money, no health insurance, and no prospects. One day as Gill sat in a Manhattan Starbucks, a 28 year old Starbucks manager named Crystal Thompson approached him, half joking, to offer him a job. With nothing to lose he took it and went from drinking coffee in a Brooks Brothers suit to serving it in a green apron. Michael Gates Gill is the son of New Yorker writer Brendan Gill, and he was a Creative Director at J. Walter Thompson advertising where he was employed for over 25 years. Currently he lives in New York within walking distance of the Starbucks store where he works, and he has no plans to retire from what he calls the best job he's ever had. His book How Starbucks Saved My Life is in the works to become a Hollywood production.

Michael Hoefflinger on Becoming Facebook

Jan 24, 2019

It seems like everyone has a Facebook account these days and that's no accident. Michael Hoefflinger, former marketing exec at the social media giant, knows first hand what it was like to sit in meetings with Mark Zuckerberg and Sheryl Sandberg and watch their straegies to grow the business. He joins us to talk about his new book Becoming Facebook, published by AMACOM, and the keys to Facebook's meteoric success.

Mike McGuire on Preparing for a Pandemic Flu Outbreak

Jan 24, 2019

Influenza pandemics are not static events like a hurricane or tornado, nor are they confined to a specific area. Pandemics come in multiple waves and experts believe that many organizations would have difficulty maintaining operations as a result of absenteeism due to illness, employees caring for the sick and other consequences. While the federal government has plans to help slow the spread of the virus among critical populations, such as healthcare workers and emergency personnel, it is up to businesses to ensure that their employees stay healthy.

Morten Hansen on Being Great at Work

Jan 24, 2019

Work smart, not hard. We've all heard that before but it's not very instructive. Morton Hansen, author of the new book Great at Work, joins us with some tips on how to avoid burnout, work less, and achieve greater results.

Nancy Duarte on Telling Your Story

Jan 24, 2019

Storytelling is an incredibly important business skill, it makes you and your message instantly more memorable. While speed and brevity are essential to a good presentation, a bad story is already too long. Nancy Duarte joins us to talk about the importance of well-constructed stories.

Nancy Tennant Snyder on Unleashing Innovation at Whirlpool

Jan 24, 2019

Nancy Tennant Snyder's new book Unleashing Innovation tells the inside story of one of the most successful innovation turnarounds in American history. Co-written with Deborah L. Duarte, Snyder reveals how Whirlpool undertook one of the largest change efforts in corporate history and show how innovation was embedded throughout the company, which ultimately led to bottom-line results. Nancy Tennant Snyder is corporate vice president for leadership and strategic competencies for Whirlpool Corporation, reporting to the chairman and CEO, Jeff M. Fettig. BusinessWeek named her one of twenty-five Innovation Champions in the world.

Nick Westergaard on Getting Scrappy

Jan 24, 2019

Social media is taking over marketing and it can be hard to keep up but you don't have to be Coca-Cola to make a splash in digital marketing. Nick Westergaard, author of the new AMACOM book Get Scrappy, is here to talk about how to figure out a strategy that will work for you and your company no matter what size. You'll be able to work smart, not hard, and do more with fewer resources

Nick Webb on What Customers Crave

Jan 24, 2019

What sets you apart isn't your product but the experience surrounding your product. People don't go to Starbucks just for the coffee, they go for the experience. Nick Webb, author of What Customers Crave, published by AMACOM, joins us to talk about how to cultivate the perfect customer experience, even if you're selling widgets, not lattes.

Noah Fleming on Enduring Customer Loyalty

Jan 24, 2019

In Evergreen: Cultivate the Enduring Customer Loyalty That Keeps Your Business Thriving (published by AMACOM), author Noah Fleming explains how constantly searching for new customers is not a solution for new business. Fleming argues that customer loyalty is built through proper marketing that balances getting new customers and keeping existing ones. The purpose of the book is to give managers the steps needed to find their right sense of balance.

Paul Gustavson on Teams of Leaders

Jan 24, 2019

Setting goals for employees may get them to complete tasks but making an employee understand their value in a real sense, down to each dollar spent and each dollar made, will get them really invested in their work. Paul Gustavson, author of Team of Leaders, publishing by AMACOM, joins us to talk about how to turn your team of individual contributors into a team of leaders.

Paul Carroll on Learning from the Worst Business Failures

Jan 24, 2019

The current conventional wisdom in the business world holds that execution is the key to a successful business strategy. Many experts have gone so far as to say that execution is more important than strategy. But, according to Paul Carroll, the coauthor of Billion-Dollar Lessons and a former Pulitzer Prize nominated journalist for The Wall Street Journal, looking back at the history of business failures teaches us that there are some strategies that are prone to disaster no matter how well they're executed. For additional training on this topic, consider these AMA seminars: * Strategy Execution: Getting It Done * Launching and Managing Strategic Alliances and Partnerships * Strategic Planning * Fundamentals of Strategic Planning

Paul Falcone on Partnering with HR

Jan 24, 2019

Human Resources works best when it works with you. Whether it's sticking up for your rights while on the job or having a productive conversation when interviewing for the job, HR is there to be your ally, not your enemy. Paul Falcone is here to talk about ways to improve the interview process for both sides of the table and the ways HR can help you out when you're on the job.

Paul Hellman on Communicating in 8 Seconds

Jan 24, 2019

In today's distracted world that's always pulling us in a million different directions it's hard to be memorable; there's too much information and too little time. Paul Hellman, author of the new AMACOM book You've Got 8 Seconds, joins us with tips on how to capture attention and keep it.

Paul Zak on the Science of Trust

Jan 24, 2019

High trust organizations are happier; happier profits and happier employees. Paul Zak was part of the team of scientists who first made the connection between oxytocin and trust and is the author of The Trust Factor, published by AMACOM. He joins us to talk about the business case for building trust and how it's worked for many companies.

Samantha Ettus on The Pie Life

Jan 24, 2019

A renowned work/life balance expert, Sam inspires corporate cultures and increases employee retention and productivity through her executive workshops and keynotes. Since earning her undergraduate and MBA degrees from Harvard, Sam has become a bestselling author of four books, a writer for Forbes, a renowned speaker and host of a nationally syndicated call-in radio show. Sam began her career in media at CAA, Turner Pictures, Nickelodeon and Ziff Davis. She later founded a personal branding firm and soon realized that she couldn’t talk to executives about their personal brands without talking about the elephant in the room: how they were managing their professional and personal lives. Sam’s passion for work/life optimization began.

Sarah Robb O'Hagan on High Performance Workplaces

Jan 24, 2019

Sarah Robb O'Hagan joins us this week to talk about some of the principles in her new book Extreme You: Step Up, Stand Out, Kick Ass, Repeat. Listen in for her advice on building great teams, how to stop your company from being too risk-averse, and working towards your own success.

Scott Edinger on the Hidden Leader

Jan 24, 2019

When we think about leaders of a company, we tend to look up the organizational hierarchy and focus on title. Scott Edinger, coauthor of The Hidden Leader, published by AMACOM, understands the impulse but wants you to remember that there's plenty of leadership power that doesn't just come from a title. It's your go-to people, the mid-level managers and individual contributors, who are ready to be tapped. So before you look to outside sources for solutions, remember to look at the resources you already have.

Scott Berinato on Good Charts

Jan 24, 2019

Data Visualization is a hot new trend and our software makes it easier than ever. Sometimes too easy. Scott Berinato, author of Good Charts: The HBR Guide to Making Smarter, More Persuasive Data Visualization, is here to talk about what ground rules you need to set so that you're telling the most compelling story with your data.

Scott Berkun on the Dance of the Possible

Jan 24, 2019

If you want to be creative you have to keep a journal. It can be electronic or physical but you have to come up with a system for keeping track of all your ideas. So says Scott Berkun, author of The Dance of the Possible, who joins us with that and more tips on turning creative ideas into action.

Scott Singer on Hitting the Curve Ball

Jan 24, 2019

Scott Singer sees the workplace as a baseball game: we can go to batting practice all we want but during the big game it’s the surprise pitches, the curve balls, that are the hardest to deal with. Preparing mentally and physically are only the beginning. In his new book, How to Hit a Curve Ball: Confront and Overcome the Unexpected in Business, Singer gives us tips on how to go from missed shots to knocking one out of the park.

Shawn Murphy on Workplace Climate

Jan 24, 2019

A lot of people are talking about workplace culture right now. Shawn Murphy, author of The Optimistic Workplace, published by AMACOM, is talking about workplace climate. He defines it as what it actually feels like to work somewhere and, unlike culture, it's much easier to influence for the better.

Stanley McChrystal on Trusting Your Team

Jan 24, 2019

Stanley McChrystal doesn’t believe in extreme secrecy. Obviously there are limits, especially when it comes to national security, but keeping all information on a need-to-know basis requires someone knowing who needs to know. Wires get crossed and the wrong decisions are made. Trust your team, whether in the military or in the office, to be able to handle the information they’re given and respond in an appropriate way.

Stephen Baum on Experiences That Shape Great Leaders

Jan 24, 2019

Becoming a leader is not about education or pedigree or even native smarts. Most of the most successful leaders started life as a regular person just like you. Certainly these leaders are smart and talented, but there are countless people even smarter and more talented who stall on the way. Something else is going on. What is it, and what can the rest of us learn from such people to improve our own chances of accomplishment? Stephen H. Baum has been an advisor and coach to CEOs for more than twenty years, first as a partner with Booz Allen & Hamilton and then as an independent practitioner. As chair of a Vistage Group of business owners and chief executives engaged in peer-to-peer coaching, Mr. Baum's role is to facilitate confidential exchange of experience, expertise, approaches to decisions, ideas and resources on issues of critical importance to the members. Mr. Baum also hosts Inside the CEO, a leadership series comprised of a CEO interview and unscripted student Q&A about the life experiences that prepared leaders to lead. Mr. Baum has taught classes in leadership development at Baruch College (CUNY) where the series is recorded. In addition, he is author of the recently published book What Made jack welch JACK WELCH. Get more information at his website: www.stephenhbaumleadership.com

Stephen Denning on the Age of Agile

Jan 24, 2019

Stephen Denning, author of The Age of Agile, distinguishes between "operational agility" and "strategic agility." Operational agility is about improving products that already exist and already have a market. Strategic agility is about creating brand new markets for brand new products. While we should always have operational agility, we should be working toward being more strategic with our agility too.

Stephen Heidari-Robinson on Surviving a Reorganization

Jan 24, 2019

Business reorganizations are a fact of life and they're going to become more frequent than ever. Stephen Heidari-Robinson joins us with some tips from the book he wrote with co-author Suzanne Heywood, ReOrg: How to Get it Right, on how to deal with a "reorg," the phases you should expect, and what questions you should be asking.

Stephen Woessner on Profitable Podcasting

Jan 24, 2019

Podcast consumption has been on a steady uptick and isn't going anywhere. Hosting a podcast is a great form of publicity and business development for even the smallest business owners but getting started can be daunting. Stephen Woessner, author of Profitable Podcasting, published by AMACOM, is here with some ideas to allay your biggest fears about starting your own podcast.

Stephen Wunker on Jobs to Be Done

Jan 24, 2019

Stephen Wunker says most companies are innovating the wrong way. They're making what their customers say they want. Instead they should be asking "why" their customers want those things and making a product the customer didn't even know the needed. Today on Edgewise Stephen joins us to give examples of companies doing it right and to talk more about his book Jobs to Be Done, published by AMACOM.

Steven Kotler and Jamie Wheal on Optimizing Your Consciousness

Jan 24, 2019

Extasis is an ancient Greek word that refers to non-ordinary states of consciousness. While not all methods of achieving extasis are work friendly, having access to higher thought processes to solve problems creatively is a skill any employer would be happy to encourage. Steven Kotler and Jamie Wheal, authors of the new book Stealing Fire, are here to talk about how to tap into these resources and also why so many CEOs keep going to Burning Man.

Susan Wilson Solovic on Building a Million Dollar Business

Jan 24, 2019

As the head of the highly successful Website Small Business Television, Susan Wilson Solovic is an authority on making money and building a thriving business. In her book, The Girls' Guide to Building a Million-Dollar Business (AMACOM Books), Solovic shows women that they not only do theyhave the power to earn more money and control their financial destinies, they deserve to. In this week's You've Been Spotted segment, Kevin Lee interviews women from AMA's course, "Preparing For Leadership: What it Takes to Take to The Lead". Listen as these participants share their concerns as women in leadership positions.

Geoff Colvin on Why Talent is Overrated

Jan 24, 2019

Why are some people – Tiger Woods, Warren Buffett, Yo-Yo Ma – so incredibly accomplished at what they do, while millions of others in those same fields never become very good? Why are some people so extraordinarily creative and innovative? Why can some continue to perform great at ages when conventional wisdom would deem it impossible? lt;P>Those are the questions Geoff Colvin set out to answer in Talent is Overrated: What Really Separates World-Class Performers From Everybody Else.

Peter R. Worrell on the Golden Age of Mergers and Acquisitions

Jan 24, 2019

Peter R. Worrell, author of Enterprise Value: How the Best Owners-Managers Build Their Fortune, Capture Their Company’s Gains, and Create Their Legacy, discusses the importance for entrepreneurial owner-managers to prepare for the eventual acquisition of his or her company. Worrell is the managing director at Bigelow LLC, which deals exclusively with the private market, and has personally worked with owner-manager clients for over thirty years. He discusses the private market today, how the golden age for mergers and acquisitions has yet to pass, and the most significant reason most acquisitions fail.

Paula Berman on Successful Business Process Management

Jan 24, 2019

Paula Berman, author of Successful Business Process Management: What You Need to Know to Get Results, has worked with quality systems and companies of all sizes and industry ranges. Berman explains the difference between a process and a procedure, the key components needed in a procedure, and why it is so important for companies to document these processes. She also discusses the significance of a process system as well as how to—and how not to—effectively organize one. Finally, Berman gives us 4 key stages needed to keep the process improvements without lapsing back and losing any efficiency gain.

Mark Van Rijmenam on the Benefits of Big Data

Jan 24, 2019

Mark Van Rijmenam, author of the new book Think Bigger, is a strategist who advises organizations on how to effectively manage their big data. He describes what big data is, why organizations should use it, and how they can benefit from it. Rijmenam suggests companies should deal with it now before it is too late—those that fail to manage big data today will cease to exist 10 to 15 years from now. He offers four tips companies should follow in order to handle their consumers’ privacy information responsibly. And while storing, managing, and analyzing big data can mean a risk for consumer privacy, it does help companies offer their customers better products and services.

Warren Berger on Asking More Questions

Jan 24, 2019

Warren Berger, author of A More Beautiful Question: The Power of Inquiry to Spark Breakthrough Ideas, discusses the importance of asking big questions. Today’s education system has deterred students from asking more and more questions by making them focus more on having the right answers. As adults, we continue this way of thinking and shy away from questioning what we see. After studying master innovators like Steve Jobs and Jeff Bazos, Berger realized that what made them so successful is the fact that they kept asking questions. To further succeed in their careers, these creative thinkers went ahead and answered those big questions.

Koen Pauwels on How It's Not the Size of the Data, It's How You Use It

Jan 24, 2019

Koen Pauwels, consultant and expert on marketing ROI (Return on Investment), describes why smarter marketing can help drive up sales profits for any company. How is big data affecting marketing trends today? In many ways it sets the benchmark for marketing to be held more accountable for business profits. And with analytics becoming such an essential component to any business, companies need to get smarter. Pauwels offers several examples on how his methodology for smarter marketing, detailed in his book It’s Not the Size of the Data—It’s How You Use It: Smarter Marketing with Analytics and Dashboard, published by AMACOM, has actually helped companies, including saving a major corporation $150 million in advertising for a green product.

Christopher Surdak on Data Crush

Jan 24, 2019

With data crush, an overwhelming mass of information becomes readily available to individuals and companies. While things we need and want have become increasingly and conveniently available to us, it has also become harder to protect ourselves from deeper analysis of our psyches (re: spending habits). Christopher Surdak, a recognized expert in information security and regulatory compliance, believes that companies must use data analysis in order to survive in this economy. In his book Data Crush: How the Informational Tidal Wave is Driving New Business Opportunities, published by AMACOM, Surdak argues that if your company does not have a data literate expert—that is also business savvy—it will not survive the next 3 to 5 years. Surdak cautions, however, that companies should never know too much about their customers. Companies can anticipate what their customers need before they even know they do, but companies should not overemphasize when marketing to consumers.

David L. Van Rooy on Career Strategies to Take You Where You Want to Be

Jan 24, 2019

It’s never too late to change career paths, and David L. Van Rooy, author of Trajectory: 7 Career Strategies to Take You from Where You Are to Where You Want to Be, published by AMACOM, shares with us the steps needed to reach your goals. Having an idea of the kind of job you want is only the first step. You also need to plan ahead and slow down. Like a couch potato aiming to finish a marathon, you must start out small—by training to finish a 5K first. Listen as Van Rooy describes turning a failure into a positive, including how to shift gears when something unexpected happens and how to ask for the right kind of feedback.

Paul B. Brown on Owning Your Future

Jan 24, 2019

Paul B Brown, author of Own Your Future: How to Think Like an Entrepreneur and Thrive in an Unpredictable Economy, published by AMACOM, argues that in order to be successful in any business one must think like an entrepreneur. You don’t have to quit your job and start a new business, but you do have to start thinking of owning your own future—become more entrepreneurial in your thoughts and actions. Brown stresses that these actions must be in the form of small steps, like a birdhouse builder selling at a local craft fair on the weekends before considering opening up a store. You learn from it, build upon it, and then repeat again. This way, Brown assures, you’ll be able to control your future.

Malcolm Frank on Code Halos

Jan 24, 2019

If companies wish to survive in today’s ever-expanding digital age, they need to recognize their customers’ code halo—a consumer’s virtual self—and implement the business model that supports it. This is why companies like Netflix are still standing while others like Blockbuster are not. Listen as Malcolm Frank, coauthor of Code Halos: How the Digital Lives of People, Things, and Organizations Are Changing the Rules of Business, describes why companies must use data scientists that can understand both the complex math behind the data as well as the business content. And since trust is the currency of the new virtual economy, companies that have all this data should never abuse this power and need to emphasize building trust with their customers.

Jim Kirkpatrick on Revamping Training to Increase its Business Impact

Jan 24, 2019

Training can’t be a rote process; for the most effective results, job training needs to be customized to each specific audience. Sometimes it even needs to start backwards, focusing on the result first and then moving back to the process. That way training becomes streamlined, more effective, and costs less. In his new book, Training On Trial: How Workplace Learning Must Reinvent Itself To Remain Relevant, Jim Kirkpatrick explains how to continue the training process, constantly adapting the business model.

Max Muller on HR Issues That Managers Need to Know Now

Jan 24, 2019

Managing people is a tricky business—and managers and small business owners can no longer get by without understanding the essentials of human resources.  New questions abound. In our increasingly legal-minded age, how much documentation do we need to keep on each employee? What’s the best way to confront complicated personnel issues, and even workplace violence?

Plus there are regulatory changes … like implementing the new I-9 form … that every manager needs to be aware of to remain compliant. The Manager’s Guide to HR by Max Muller provides readers with a straightforward, step-by-step guide to human resources topics.

Lawrence Allen on the War for Chocolate in China

Jan 24, 2019

As China comes into its own as a world economic power, a new, huge consumer class is emerging, hungry for all things Western. In this land where twenty-five years ago most of the population had never tasted chocolate, five icons of Western business are now slugging it out in a battle royal to see which will become the Emperor of Chocolate in China.

Chocolate Fortunes (AMACOM) by Lawrence Allen  examines each of the five major players—Hershey, Nestlé, Cadbury, Mars, and Ferrero—and the trials they face as they attempt to dominate their market in an enigmatic and still-developing economy. In addition Chocolate Fortunes examines the unique opportunities and challenges inherent in the Chinese business universe.

Joel Kurtzman on the Strength of Common Purpose Organizations

Jan 24, 2019

When business seems like a dog-eat-dog world, it’s the common purpose organizations, the ones where everyone works together for the same goal, that are thriving. Walk into a company like Apple or the insurance agency FM Global and the difference is palpable; thanks to involved and invested leaders, the employees know why they’re there and take pride in their work. In his new book Common Purpose: How Great Leaders Get Organization to Achieve the Extraordinary, Joel Kurtzman says that the hard work to achieve that cohesiveness is worth it.

Keith McFarland on Turning Tough Times into Triumph

Jan 24, 2019

Bounce, by New York Times best-selling author Keith McFarland, is a leadership fable for those wary of fables, a story that rejects pat, heard-it-before advice, and shows how to use challenges to make both yourself and your organization stronger.

Michael Bungay Stanier on Great Work

Jan 24, 2019

Work smart, not hard. Plenty of employees have heard that but how does it actually work? In his new book Do More Great Work, Michael Bungay Stanier offers fifteen different exercises that give practical advice for how to turn your results from good to great.

David Noer on Healing the Wounds of Layoffs

Jan 24, 2019

Reports of the most recent layoffs are making the front pages of our newspapers with frightening regularity. And massive downsizing continues to reshape the face of American business. But what about those who remain behind? In his updated 2009 edition of Healing the Wounds, David M. Noer, an expert frequently quoted in major media such as The Wall Street Journal and Fortune on the topic of layoffs and layoff survivor sickness, addresses these problems. Drawing on case studies and original research, Healing the Wounds provides executives, human resource professionals, managers, and consultants with an original model and clear guidelines for revitalizing downsized organizations and the employees left behind.

Phil Geier on the Creation of Advertising

Jan 24, 2019

Before there was the hit TV show Mad Men, before Coca Cola was the real thing, before branding became a marketing buzzword, there was Phil “Deals” Geier. The story of how this visionary, who created the modern advertising holding company and brought The Interpublic Group from $500 million to $5.6 billion in revenues, is shared for the first time in SURVIVE TO THRIVE: Sustaining Yourself, Your Brand, and Your Business from Recession to Recovery. In addition to sound business wisdom, SURVIVE TO THRIVE reveals an insider’s take on the glamorous real world of 1960s and 70s advertising and features a veritable who’s who of mid-20th century luminaries.

Dr. Matthew Kiernan on How to Successfully Invest in a Sustainable World

Jan 24, 2019

For businesses and investors, there’s no doubt about it. The smart money is going green. And the growing movement towards ecologically forward thinking companies is quickly becoming bigger and bigger. What may be surprising to some is that the socially responsible organizations aren’t just doing the right thing for the environment. They’re also paying off financially, making their investors money and increasing the bottom line.

Investing in a Sustainable World (AMACOM) by Dr. Matthew J. Kiernan offers clear proof, through facts, figures, and hard documentation, that “going green” leads directly to better stock market performance…and that investors and companies who ignore it will, in fact, lose money. The book reveals the most powerful global mega­trends—from the ongoing focus on emerging markets to natural resource depletion—which are transforming the very basis on which companies will compete, and offers an approach to sustainability-enhanced investing beneficial to both investors and companies.

Steve Cone on Successful Marketing Through a Recession

Jan 24, 2019

With more than 35 years at the top of the marketing profession, Steve Cone has led campaigns for many companies including Citigroup, American Express, Fidelity, Apple, and United Airlines, as well as presidential campaigns for both major parties.

John Goodman on the Future of Customer Service

Jan 24, 2019

Most executives still view customer service as a cost center, a necessary nuisance that drains funds from other more strategic investments. But for companies with a strategic approach, the customer service function itself is an unbeatable marketing machine, a word of mouth monster that directly drives sales, repeats business referrals, and increases the bottom line.

Ric Merrifield on Rethinking Cost Cutting and Boosting Innovation

Jan 24, 2019

It’s the trap that ensnares virtually every business. We focus on process: “how” we’re doing the job. And we forget about the bigger issue: “what” we’re doing and “why” we’re doing it. That’s why we’re leaving so much value on the table.

In Rethink, business architect Ric Merrifield exposes this problem with vivid examples and introduces breakthrough techniques for overcoming it. Merrifield presents case studies ranging from ING DIRECT to Amazon.com to Procter & Gamble. These diverse companies have learned how to cut costs, strengthen innovation, and profit from change all at the same time.

Aviad Meitar on Refreshing Romania with Pepsi

Jan 24, 2019

A familiar brand in America but overseas, Pepsi was not a household name until now. In his new book, An Unimaginable Journey: How Pepsi Beat the Odds in Romania, Aviad Meitar explains how Romania as an emerging economy was poised to become a significant trade partner with the rest of Europe and overseas. By bringing new skills, sales and management to a community eager to learn, he oversaw the Pepsi's growth to the ultimate sale of the business to PepsiCo’s 2nd largest bottler worldwide in mid 2006.

Larry Samuel on the History and Future of Wealth Culture

Jan 24, 2019

As Americans, we are unapologetically obsessed with money and the people who have a lot of it. We are curious, to say the least, about how rich people make their money, how they spend it, and what separates them from the rest of us. Rich: The Rise and Fall of American Wealth Culture by Larry Samuel puts the American obsession with all things money into much needed perspective. Rich shows how American wealth culture as we knew it has become almost extinct owing to a variety of social and economic factors over the years.

Josh Bersin on the Upswing in E-Learning

Jan 24, 2019

According to Josh Bersin, learning technology expert, the decrease in spending on learning and development in the corporate sector due to the economic downturn is starting to creep its way back up, and technology is at the forefront. In this episode of Edgwise, Bersin discusses how companies including Cisco, GE, and Apple approach the training and development of their talent.  He defines trends of high impact learning cultures, informal training initiatives, Blended Learning, an

Keith McFarland on What Makes a Breakthrough Company

Jan 24, 2019

The vast majority of small businesses stay small - and not by choice. Only the most savvy and persistent ”a tiny one tenth of one percent” break through to annual sales above $250 million. In The Breakthrough Company, Keith McFarland pinpoints how everyday companies become extraordinary, showing that luck is a negligible factor. Rather, breakthrough success turns out to be associated with a clearly identifiable set of strategies and skills that anyone in any business can emulate - from

Deborrah Himsel on Maintaining Your Legacy

Jan 24, 2019

Great leaders are determined by how well they are able to translate their goals into action. Deborah Himsel’s book Beauty Queen: Inside the Reign of Avon's Andrea Jung tells the story of the CEO’s rise and fall at Avon while interweaving discussions of business and corporate cultural issues. Andrea found herself to be in the right place at the right time while enjoying success in re-vitalizing a brand and mobilizing a well-rounded and successful work team. However, the second half of An

Chip Bell on Extraordinary Customer Service

Jan 24, 2019

Chip is the author or co-author of sixteen books including Magnetic Service: Secrets for Creating Passionately Devoted Customers (with Bilijack Bell), Service Magic:The Art of Amazing Your Customers, Customers As Partners: Building Relationships That...

Jaynie Smith on Competitive Advantage

Jan 24, 2019

Jaynie L. Smith is the author of Creating Competitive Advantage and president of Smart Advantage, Inc., a marketing/management consultancy whose clients range from mid-sized to Fortune 500 companies. She consults nationally and internationally with CEOs and executives, helping their businesses define competitive advantages.

Kevan Hall on Speed Management

Jan 24, 2019

Kevan Hall founded Global IntegrationTM in 1994, to develop "the skills of working internationally" for the world's leading companies. He realized that the tools he and his colleagues developed for complex international, virtual, remote and matrixed organizations were based on creating underlying speed and simplicity and were applicable to almost any complex company.

Today Global Integration is a global consulting and train

Stephen M.R. Covey on Using Trust for a New Year of Success

Jan 24, 2019

In this week's You've Been Spotted segment, Kevin Lee asks participants from AMA's course Coaching and Counseling for Outstanding Job Performance "about their "Trust Resolution" for the new year. Listen to these participants share practices, tips and guidelines they've learned from the course.

Howard Gardner on the Need for Multiple "Minds"

Jan 24, 2019

Howard Gardner is the John H. and Elisabeth A. Hobbs Professor of Cognition and Education at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. He also holds positions as Adjunct Professor of Psychology at Harvard University and Senior Director of Harvard Project Zero. Among numerous honors, Gardner received a MacArthur Prize Fellowship in 1981.

In 1990, he was the first American to receive the University of

Bill George on Leadership Values

Jan 24, 2019

Bill George is Professor of Management Practice, Henry B. Arthur Fellow of Ethics, at Harvard Business School, where he is teaching leadership and leadership development. He is the author of new best-selling leadership book, "True North: Discover Your Authentic Leadership." His previous book, Authentic Leadership: Rediscovering the Secrets to Creating Lasting Value," was also a best-seller.

C.J. Hayden on How to Market Yourself

Jan 24, 2019

C.J. Hayden is a Master Certified Coach and principal of Wings Business Coaching, LLC, a firm that teaches self-employed professionals to make more money with less effort. Hayden is the author of "Get Clients NOW!" (AMACOM) and The One-Person Marketing Plan Workbook. Since 1992, C.J. has been teaching professionals and business owners to make a better living doing what they love. Her Get Clients NOW! system has been adopted by thousa

Bob Wall on Coaching for Emotional Intelligence

Jan 24, 2019

When managers coach their team members on their performance, "emotional intelligence" may not be the first thing that comes to mind. But some believe that performance development depends on the employee's emotional intelligence, and the ability of the manager to encourage and increase it. In his book, "Coaching for Emotional Intelligence" (AMACOM), Bob Wall provides a carefully planned strategy to help managers address such factors as personality traits, communications styles, and personal behav

Chuck Martin on Leadership Smarts

Jan 24, 2019

Chuck Martin is Chairman and CEO of NFI Research, a firm that analyzes business and management trends. His new book "Smarts: Are We Hardwired for Success?", identifies the key behavioral skills that determine success in the workplace. AMA has collaborated with Martin to develop a new seminar, Leadership Smarts, which revolutionizes the concept of intelligent leadership.* It introduces a

Greg Bennett on How to "Close" a Consultative Sales Deal

Jan 24, 2019

Greg Bennett has been a top sales trainer, consultant, strategist and coach since 1988. He is the author of the book "Consultative Closing", which offers simple steps that build sales-client relationships while winning even the toughest sales.

Bennett has worked with hundreds of organizations and thousands of salespeople in a wide variety of industries, including extensive sales consultation and str

John Mattone on Creating a Sustainable Organization through Leadership Management and Development

Jan 24, 2019

John Mattone, author of Talent Leadership: A Proven Method for Identifying and Developing High-Potential Employees, joins us on Edgewise today to share the findings of his extensive research on talent management. Mattone explains how organizations can mitigate their operating risk and drive breakthrough results and discusses how major companies such as Microsoft, Nestle a

Stephen M. R. Covey on How to Build, Keep and Repair Trust

Jan 24, 2019

Stephen M.R. Covey is the former CEO of Covey Leadership Center, which, under his stewardship, became the largest leadership development company in the world. A Harvard MBA, he joined Covey Leadership Center as a Client Developer and later became National Sales Manager and then President & CEO.

Under Covey's direction, the company grew rapidly and profitably, achieving Inc. 500 status

Ann Rhoades on Revolutionizing Company Culture

Jan 24, 2019

Human resource maven Ann Rhoades believes that a company’s outward culture is a direct reflection of its internal character, its people. In recent years employees and employers have had a rough time navigating and maintaining emotional and operational roles.  Rhoades shares the principles she’s developed leading initiatives at companies such as Juniper Networks and Jet Blue and guides us through six steps to understanding and invigorating your company’s culture from the inside o

Cal Turner Jr. on My Father's Business

Jan 24, 2019

Cal Turner Jr. was the CEO of Dollar General for decades after inheriting the business from his father. He joins us to talk about how faith and family helped him turn a million dollar business into a billion dollar business, plus a few stories from his new book My Father's Business: The Small-Town Values That Build Dollar General into a Billion Dollar-Company.

Cheryl Strauss Einhorn on Simplifying Problem Solving

Jan 24, 2019

You'd think with all the technology at our fingertips we'd be making decisions faster than ever. But tech still needs a human driver and we're as fallible as ever. Cheryl Strauss Einhorn is here with her new book Problem Solved and her AREA method for streamlining solving complex problems.

Ajay Agrawal on How Artificial Intelligence Can Help Us

Jan 24, 2019

Artificial Intelligence is portrayed in fiction and media as either killer robots or the thing that will save us all. Ajay Agrawal and his coauthors of Prediction Machines take a different view, one of economists. To them, the most important question around any new tech is: what will this reduce the cost of? Listen to find out the one thing AI excel at when it comes to cost reduction.