Richard Thaler on the "Architecture of Choice"

    Jan 24, 2019

    While many employers have traditionally viewed their younger employees as their most precious assets, the truth is that their more seasoned workers are often their most valuable. In his new book, Working Longer (AMACOM), William J Rothwell gives recruiters, managers, and trainers the tools they need to nurture and empower these vital employees. The book includes: * creative strategies for recruiting retirees and developing a senior friendly workplace * career and performance management techniques for effectively motivating and engaging older workers * instructional design facilitation methods that will enable older workers to upgrade their skills. About the Authors William J. Rothwell, Ph.D. (State College, PA), is Professor-in-Charge of a graduate program in Workforce Education and Development at Penn State University. Diane Spokus (University Park, PA) is an adjunct instructor at Penn State University. Joel Reaser (Arlington, VA) is S. V. P. at the National Older Worker Career Center. Harvey Sterns, Ph.D. (Akron, OH) is the Director of the Institute for Lifespan Development and Gerontology at the University of Akron. For additional training on this topic, consider these AMA seminars: * Talent Management For related reading from AMACOM Books: * Working Longer by William J. Rothwell, Diane Spokus, Harvey Sterns, and Joel Reaser * Generations at Work by Ron Zemke, Claire Raines, and Bob Filipczak * The New Workforceby Harriet HankinOur errors are what make us human, but until now, they have been largely ignored by those around us, whether they make a complex public policy or sell us a plain old bottle of wine. In a new book, Nudge, Economist Richard Thaler and legal scholar Cass...Our errors are what make us human, but until now, they have been largely ignored by those around us, whether they make a complex public policy or sell us a plain old bottle of wine. In a new book, Nudge, Economist Richard Thaler and legal scholar Cass Sunstein, invite us into an alternative world, one that takes our humanness as a given. They show that by knowing how people think, we can design choice environments that make it easier for them to choose what is best for themselves, their families, and their society. Richard H. Thaler is the Ralph and Dorothy Keller Distinguished Service Professor of Behavioral Science and Economics and the director of the Center for Decision Research at the University of Chicago's Graduate School of Business.AMA_Edgewise_0823.mp3