Dan Ariely on Understanding the Logic Behind Illogical Decisions

    Jan 24, 2019

    The only way to find true security is by following your calling and then finding or creating work that matches your passion. Dan Miller's new book No More Mondays addresses people looking for guidance on how to launch a new career or business, those who want to stay in their current jobs and give the old 9-to-5 model a twenty-first-century makeover, and managers desperate to understand the way people want to work today. For all of them, Dan Miller's message is loud and clear: If you're one of those people who dread going to work on Mondays, do something about it! Dan Miller is the author of the bestselling 48 Days to the Work You Love book, workbook, and audio program. As a life coach, he has guided people through the anguish of unexpected change to the exhilaration of meaningful work and increased time and financial freedom. Dan has appeared on CBS’s The Early Show and MSNBC’s Hardball with Chris Matthews. To learn more, read these AMACOM Books: * Myself and Other More Important Matters, by Charles Handy * Finding & Keeping Great Employees, by Jim Harris, Ph.D., Joan Brannick, Ph.D. * The Loyalty Advantage by Dianne Michonski Durkin * The Joy of Retirement: Finding Happiness, Freedom, and the Life You've Always Wanted by David C. BorchardIrrational behavior is a part of human nature, but as MIT professor Dan Ariely has discovered in 20 years of researching behavioral economics, people tend to behave irrationally in a predictable fashion. Drawing on psychology and economics, behavioral...Irrational behavior is a part of human nature, but as MIT professor Dan Ariely has discovered in 20 years of researching behavioral economics, people tend to behave irrationally in a predictable fashion. Drawing on psychology and economics, behavioral economics can show us why cautious people make poor decisions about sex when aroused, why patients get greater relief from a more expensive drug over its cheaper counterpart and why honest people may steal office supplies or communal food, but not money. According to Ariely, our understanding of economics, now based on the assumption of a rational subject, should, in fact, be based on our systematic, unsurprising irrationality. In his new book Predictably Irrational, Ariely argues that greater understanding of previously ignored or misunderstood forces (emotions, relativity and social norms) that influence our economic behavior brings a variety of opportunities for reexamining individual motivation and consumer choice, as well as economic and educational policy.AMA_Edgewise_0816.mp3