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The Seven Deadly Sins of Negotiating

Recording Date: September 07, 2007
Price: Free

Attending this Webcast is free. Registration is required.
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Overview

Yes, experience may be the best teacher, but when it comes to negotiating you can’t afford on-the-job training.

From the simplest to the most complex negotiations, there are pitfalls and traps that are easy to fall into if you're not aware of them. Commit one of these "deadly sins" and you are virtually guaranteed to lose the deal.

As a negotiator, you may be a buyer or seller, a customer or supplier, a boss or an employee, a business partner, a diplomat or a civil servant. On a more personal level, you may be a spouse, friend, parent or child. In all these cases your negotiating skills strongly influence your ability to get ahead in both your career and your other interpersonal relationships.

This Webcast is not just more "tips and tricks" or "ploys and tactics" that you've already heard. We drill down into the core issues essential to every successful negotiation.

This Webcast is for executives, managers, salespeople and top-level deal makers who are responsible for negotiating the best possible terms of an agreement for their company.

About the Presenters

Frank Acuff is an adjunct professor of organizational behavior at Northwestern University. He is the author of Shake Hands with the Devil: How to Master Life’s Negotiations from Hell and How to Negotiate Anything with Anyone Anywhere Around the World.

Mr. Acuff was formerly corporate vice president for employee relations for First Commerce Corporation, a $3.8 billion bank holding company. While working for McDermott International, he held key management positions in the United States, Singapore and the United Arab Emirates. His diverse clientele includes Accenture, Caterpillar, Centers for Disease Control, Coca Cola, Delta Air Lines, Exxon International, Home Depot, MasterCard International, Microsoft, Ogilvy & Mather, Pfizer, Pillsbury, Rockwell International, Royal Bank of Canada, Sears, Unilever, the U.S. Army, Walgreens, Wilson Sporting Goods and the Wrigley Company.

Larry Ray has a private practice specializing in mediation, negotiation, arbitration and facilitation. Mr. Ray mediates for The World Bank Groups, U.S. Postal Service and National Archives; directs the Mediation Center of Greater Washington, D.C. Metro Area; and arbitrates for the National Arbitration Forum, National Association of Securities Dealers (NASD) and the United States Arbitration and Mediation (USAM).

After serving for five years as a prosecutor in Columbus, Ohio, he was executive director of the American Bar Association Dispute Resolution Section and the National Association for Community Mediation. He is senior lecturer on mediation and negotiation at the George Washington University Law School and an online instructor for Keller Graduate School/DeVry University. He is coauthor of The Conflict Resolution Training Manual.

 

Technical Requirements

To fully participate in this electronic, interactive and live session, please check your system (or ask your IT department) to ensure it meets the following requirements:

Supported OS, Browser and Additional Requirements

Microsoft® Windows® 98 SE, 2000, XP, Windows VistaTM Home Basic, Home Premium, Ultimate, Business, or Enterprise (32-bit or 64-bit editions)

  • Internet Explorer 5.0 or higher
  • Netscape Navigator 7.1
  • AOL 9
  • Mozilla Firefox 1.5 or higher

Macintosh (OS X 10.2, 10.3, 10.4)

  • Safari 1.1 or higher
  • Mozilla Firefox 1.5 or higher

Linux

  • Mozilla Firefox 1.5 or higher

Solaris

  • Mozilla 1.7 or higher

Additional Requirements:

  • Macromedia Flash Player 8 or higher
  • Macromedia Flash Player 9 or higher for Linux and Solaris
  • Minimum bandwidth requirement is 56 kb/sec

Important tip - Please allow 15 minutes prior to joining a session to conduct your set-up and testing! Dial-up connectors - please allow more time.